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Bryan Haycock
04-15-2008, 01:14 PM
J Strength Cond Res. 2008 Jan;22(1):212-25.

Elimination of delayed-onset muscle soreness by pre-resistance cardioacceleration
before each set.

Davis WJ, Wood DT, Andrews RG, Elkind LM, Davis WB.

Division of Physical and Biological Sciences, University of California at Santa
Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, USA.

We compared delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) induced by anaerobic resistance
exercises with and without aerobic cardioacceleration before each set, under the
rationale that elevated heart rate (HR) may increase blood perfusion in muscles
to limit eccentric contraction damage and/or speed muscle recovery. In two
identical experiments (20 men, 28 women), well-conditioned athletes paired by
similar physical condition were assigned randomly to experimental or control
groups. HR (independent variable) was recorded with HR monitors. DOMS (dependent
variable) was self-reported using Borg's Rating of Perceived Pain scale. After
identical pre-training strength testing, mean DOMS in the experimental and
control groups was indistinguishable (P > or = 0.19) for musculature employed in
eight resistance exercises in both genders, validating the dependent variable.
Subjects then trained three times per week for 9 (men) to 11 (women) weeks in a
progressive, whole-body, concurrent training protocol. Before each set of
resistance exercises, experimental subjects cardioaccelerated briefly (mean HR
during resistance training, 63.7% HR reserve), whereas control subjects rested
briefly (mean HR, 33.5% HR reserve). Mean DOMS among all muscle groups and
workouts was discernibly less in experimental than control groups in men (P =
0.0000019) and women (P = 0.0007); less for each muscle group used in nine
resistance exercises in both genders, discernible (P < 0.025) in 15 of 18
comparisons; and less in every workout, discernible (P < 0.05) in 32% (men) and
55% (women) of workouts. Most effect sizes were moderate. In both genders, mean
DOMS per workout disappeared by the fourth week of training in experimental but
not control groups. Aerobic cardioacceleration immediately before each set of
resistance exercises therefore rapidly eliminates DOMS during vigorous
progressive resistance training in athletes.

imported_electric
04-15-2008, 02:20 PM
Bryan, is there further consequence of this or it is only applicable to the soreness itself. My question is, can we assume that pre-resistance cardioacceleration can also improve hypertrophy or not?

Bryan Haycock
04-25-2008, 02:34 PM
<div>
(electric @ Apr. 15 2008,12:20)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Bryan, is there further consequence of this or it is only applicable to the soreness itself. My question is, can we assume that pre-resistance cardioacceleration can also improve hypertrophy or not?</div>
Its not clear... The relationship between DOMS and growth is co-relational, but not cause-effect.