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Thread: No of Sets

  1. #1
    imported_daxie Guest

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    Please also explain why it is your preferred method and why other's aren't.
    I personally see this as one of the most variating thing in hst schemes, which makes it often unclear for newbies I think.
    Thank you,
    daxie
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    South Africa
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    Angry

    Daxie

    I feel that as we start on 15's and it can be pretty hard if done properly one set and little rest does the trick, plus one can use a rudimentary, mostly compounds type of program, at 10's one can add some variation plus a few isolation exercises, this is where we may differ, here I use two sets but not of the same exercise, (except for the main compounds - bench/squat/deads).

    I start adding variation and will perform a second type of exercise usually a isolation one as a post-exhaust in a superset, rest is 30 - 60 seconds.

    At the 5's and negs, I use even more variation, but for the big one's I like to build up (squat for example I'll do 50/15 - 70/10 - 90/8 - 100/5 x 2), I feel that it gives me the built in safety I need and this is very personal others may feel the same or quite contrary , I only consider the last set the working set then I will still jump to leg extensions for the extra pump!

    Daxie - I suggest you download the HST tweaking e-book that Vicious set up, as it explains all these variations well, then it is a matter of personal choice

    By the way, I saw the pics, looks good just a little beefing up and you will look awsome.

    Fausto
    Be open, be kind, most of all learn what you can from others, teach also without reservations, because by doing for others it will be done for you!

    Soldier on!
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Because HST is based on the principle that load is the primary determinant of size, I like to keep as many other variables constant and focus on increasing the load over time. With this I prefer keeping the total number of reps as constant as I can while decreasing the number of reps per set. I just increase the number of sets to keep total reps constant.

    I voted for increasing the number of sets as reps decrease. As sets increase, I also don't force myself to always complete a specific number of reps. If my strength is dropping yet I want to complete more reps I'll simply do as many as I am able regardless of what rep range I am supposed to hit. I stop just short of failure most of the time but not always.
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  4. #4
    imported_dkm1987 Guest

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    I voted for Clustering the Reps. Pretty much for the same reasons Bryan cites, it simply removes the variables of sets and keeps the number of reps consistent throughout the cycle, but I always start my first set with the prescribed number of reps or more.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    I started my first cycle and I am doing two sets for every exercise. Why? Because it was the basic program Bryan laid out on the front page lol.

    I am just testing this and then Ill see if I want to adjust it or not. For my next cycle I am considering just 1 set for 15's, 2 sets for compounds/1 set for isolations for the 10's, and 3 sets for compounds and 2 sets for isolations on the 5's....

    But I dont know.
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  6. #6

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    I voted clustering for the reasons stated by Bryan and Dan.

    Nathan
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    What exactly is clustering? Can you give me an example?
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    410

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Bryan Haycock @ June 29 2005,2:48)]Because HST is based on the principle that load is the primary determinant of size, I like to keep as many other variables constant and focus on increasing the load over time. With this I prefer keeping the total number of reps as constant as I can while decreasing the number of reps per set. I just increase the number of sets to keep total reps constant.
    I voted for increasing the number of sets as reps decrease. As sets increase, I also don't force myself to always complete a specific number of reps. If my strength is dropping yet I want to complete more reps I'll simply do as many as I am able regardless of what rep range I am supposed to hit. I stop just short of failure *most of the time but not always.
    do you have a specific # of reps you like to hit???

    like for example supposing for squats you'd want to hit 30 reps..

    so during the 15s you might only need to do 2 sets, while during the 10s and 5s you may need as many as 6-8

    how do you go about keeping them # of reps total constant??
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    410

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    Bryan i was thinking it could be really helpful if you could make a complete and detailed journal of one FULL HST cycle you complete. like sets, reps etc i think it'd be really handy to look over.
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  10. #10
    imported_daxie Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (OneMoreRep @ June 29 2005,11:14)]
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Bryan Haycock @ June 29 2005,2:48)]Because HST is based on the principle that load is the primary determinant of size, I like to keep as many other variables constant and focus on increasing the load over time. With this I prefer keeping the total number of reps as constant as I can while decreasing the number of reps per set. I just increase the number of sets to keep total reps constant.
    I voted for increasing the number of sets as reps decrease. As sets increase, I also don't force myself to always complete a specific number of reps. If my strength is dropping yet I want to complete more reps I'll simply do as many as I am able regardless of what rep range I am supposed to hit. I stop just short of failure most of the time but not always.
    do you have a specific # of reps you like to hit???
    like for example supposing for squats you'd want to hit 30 reps..
    so during the 15s you might only need to do 2 sets, while during the 10s and 5s you may need as many as 6-8
    how do you go about keeping them # of reps total constant??
    Agree, while doing 2 sets of 15 3 times a week seems very easy to do, 6 sets of 5s doing 3 times a weeks seems to be a lot harder to do...

    Plus the time it might take?

    Or is that the intention?
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