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Thread: Simplify and Win!

  1. #41
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    (Fausto @ Oct. 26 2006,13:46)
    QUOTE
    QUOTE
    If it walks like a duck, looks like a duck...then it must be a .....


    Yeah, that is still not confusing the muscle, but a technique, O & G uses a similar technique.

    Our pohysiology is too complicated to get "confused" that is why I say it is a retarded way of putting things, nothin in our body gets "confused", IMO, our Maker thought things out just right!

    So as you say it must be a duck!

    Although I agree with Fausto lets look into this some more. I agree neural learning is a key and when you keep exercises to a minimum the body adapts and learns the movement patterns better (or so it seems) hence you make quicker strength gains which should bring on muscle gains. When this stops or plateau's one should SD....however what if you could activate some other fibers with different angles or exercises hence not having to SD as quickly.....lets look at this closer.

    I am aware you start lighter and increase poundages until reaching your max on the last workout on any given rep range but again, should failure be reached or should more reps be completed if possible for even the latter stages of a cycle?




    Keep in mind that “starting light” ONLY works after Strategic (or accidental) Deconditioning. If you go straight from training heavy to training light, the stimulus will be inadequate to cause growth.



    Even though that beginning of an HST cycle is relatively light, it must still be heavy enough. What’s “heavy enough” is determined by the condition of the muscle at the time the load is applied. Don’t be fooled into thinking fatigue is the indicator of what’s heavy enough. It isn’t. Have you ever done something you weren’t accustomed to doing and you got sore the next day? Even though the weight was relatively light or the activity wasn’t even strenuous? This is a manifestation of the distinction between perceived effort and the mechanical effects of loading muscle tissue. In other words, it felt easy, but I still got sore.

    Does this mean that doing exercises you are not accustomed to could cause some growth?

    We all know soreness is not a indicator of growth...but IMO it looks like it could be???

    This is a statement from Bryan Haycock from one of his articles.

    Discuss...



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  2. #42
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    Er, I'm no-way a noob: but this confuses the t!ts offa me... and this is simplified?
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  3. #43
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    (Joe.Muscle @ Feb. 28 2007,12:12)
    QUOTE
    Have you ever done something you weren’t accustomed to doing and you got sore the next day?[/b] Even though the weight was relatively light or the activity wasn’t even strenuous? This is a manifestation of the distinction between perceived effort and the mechanical effects of loading muscle tissue. In other words, it felt easy, but I still got sore.

    Does this mean that doing exercises you are not accustomed to could cause some growth?

    We all know soreness is not a indicator of growth...but IMO it looks like it could be???

    Discuss...

    Joe, here are a few of my own experiences based around your comments:

    Last summer I took my lad and my niece for a 2 mile row along the coast... against the wind... then the wind changed for the return trip so I was rowing against it on the way back too. Now, I hadn't rowed a dinghy for about 15 years. Did I get sore? Why yes! BUT only may hands! Back and arms were absolutely fine. I was expecting that I would be sore as heck but any soreness was barely noticeable! So, my back training had been similar enough in functionality to actual rowing to mean that the low-intensity row had very little effect on the muscles involved.

    On the other hand, I recently started jogging again during my cut. Got some slight soreness in my calves and inner-thighs (adductors, sartorius etc) after the first few runs. That makes sense as I have only been doing squats and deads for leg work recently. When I did some sprinting I got a bit more soreness in my inner-thighs only.

    I wouldn't expect to grow from either of these two relatively 'low-intensity' activities (ie. rowing and jogging). Intensity and load (ie. strain on the muscle tissue) are way lower than what I am accustomed to in the gym. Some smaller muscle groups may not be worked as thoroughly through lifting and so they might be stimulated to grow a bit by low-intensity activities.

    However, all in all, I feel that squatting, deadlifting, benching, dipping, rowing, chinning and pressing will pretty much cover all the bases and be all that anyone really needs for most muscles to be worked hard enough to grow if they put in the required effort and determination, volume, frequency and eat well.
    "Be the best that you can be."

    PR's:
    Deadlift: 215kg (474lb) - pre-hernia!
    Low-bar Back Squat: 190kg (419lb) 16/04/10 @BW ~210lb
    Bench: 130kg (287lb) 01/02/13
    Total: 1,180lb
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  4. #44
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    I agree...and maybe I should clarify those are not my statements above they are a excerpt from an article Bryan posted.
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  5. #45
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    Joe, consider my definition of exersize. It is activity that is above and beyond that to which you are presently accustomed. That for a couch potatoe is a walk. For a walker, a jog, and so forth.
    But exersize is of course useless. That's like having a diet soda with a 3 course meal; you're not gonna get thin. Training, however, is consistent exersize, and as we all know, with progression to keep it within the definition of exersize, will cause hypertrophy to occur.
    Yes, Virginia, it's a bit more than just "Shut up and lift".
    I do because I can.
    I can because I do.

    Squat, bench, chin, deadlift, dip, row. The rest is secondary.
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  6. #46
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    QUOTE
    However, all in all, I feel that squatting, deadlifting, benching, dipping, rowing, chinning and pressing will pretty much cover all the bases and be all that anyone really needs for most muscles to be worked hard enough to grow if they put in the required effort and determination, volume, frequency and eat well.


    I used to think that it is important to work every little muscle in the body separately to induce optimal hypertrophy. Now every time I perform an isolation movement I can't help feeling that I am just wasting my energy and time, when I could be squatting, deadlifting, dipping, chinning...

    It's not that isolations do not have their place in a training program (especially for advanced athletes), but the basic compounds go WAY longer than most people think.

    Mainly a bump to a great thread... Cheers, Fausto!

    All the best,
    Dimitris
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  7. #47
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    I may be the reigning king of simple, here's my workout:



    * Flat Bench
    * Military Press
    * BB Rows
    * Dead Lift


    * *I've been using only these since september '06 and have seen much better gains in size AND strength then from before when I was doing a more "typical" workout.I have also used these 4 compounds in a 10 set by 3 rep 2 times a week program and made some of the largest strength jumps of my lifting "career" for lack of a better word.So yeah, I'm a HUGE believer in simplicity, and have also come to believe that it all really boils down to the dead lift *


    * *And altho I'm only midway thru my second HST cycle, I've done straight up "vanilla" HST both times, in terms of reps ,sets ect. .

    * *Everytime the thought of a curl or something comes in to my head I just think "that would take away *from my BB row" ( current 1rm is around 1.25 to 1.5x my bodyweight)and it goes away...



    "- In the perfect world you only need one working set per exercise/week. Well, the world ain't perfect so I do two..." (Dorian Yates)
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  8. #48
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    Mainly a bump to a great thread... Cheers, Fausto!

    I mainly got you guys started that's all,and yes...it has become onne of the best threads I have seen in this forum for a long time.

    Ever since I started liting just 4 compounds alternated with 2 others, I hardly ever get to do isos, today however I felt like giving my arms two great supersets and it felt great...I actually missed the buggers...but it happens very seldom, the compounds have really looked after me well.

    They're the best "nany" I've ever had.

    Russ

    QUOTE
    it all really boils down to the dead lift


    Count dracula may overhear you NO really...it is a great overall builder...no doubt.
    Be open, be kind, most of all learn what you can from others, teach also without reservations, because by doing for others it will be done for you!

    Soldier on!
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  9. #49
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    hi

    first of all, i must say that this board is great. the amount of usefull ideas and information being shared is totally amazing.

    anyhow i am totally new to bodybuilding and gym. I am a bit of a weedy nerd and decided a few weeks ago to get into bodybuilding. I have joind a regular gym and have not seen any bodybuilders there at all.

    i have spent a few weeks reading this and other BB boards and researching some basic muscle science.

    i want get started on HST straight away and cannot figure out a routine. i like the idea of a a few compound exercises rather than spending hours each w/o. however, i cannot evel pull my meagere weight with chin-ups and that sort of thing, so i really need some advice.

    what i need is a routine which (if possible) does not rely on bodyweight and will not take more than 1 1/2 hours per w/o. i do not have a partner, if that is relevant.

    also, does it make sense to get started straight on HST, or should i just go to the gym and bash away like a madman for a while and see how far`that gets me first?

    anyhow, a routine of a few exercises which hist every muscle would be ideal, so any help would be very very much appreciated.

    thanks in advance!
    sa
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  10. #50
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    Make the meat of your workout barbell movements:

    full squats-entire lower body
    deadlifts-calves, thighs, traps, erectors, forearms
    bench press-chest,deltoids,triceps
    standing press-deltoids, triceps, abs, traps
    bent rows-entire back, hamstrings, forearms, biceps

    Some other good accessory work are chin-ups, dips, DB flyes or presses, DB rows, power cleans, wide-grip pulldowns, curls, skullcrushers, calf raises.

    In my opinion stay away from fancy machines. *Cable machines are ok, hammer strength are ok, but mainly use barbells and dumbells.



    -Carl
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