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Thread: Performance Research

  1. #1
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    This forum was created for people to discuss exercise physiology and other published research on sport performance.
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  2. #2
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    and let me guess... coach hale will be posting here a lot?!
    The Road to 10% // Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up. -Thomas Edison
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  3. #3
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    <div>
    (colby2152 @ Mar. 28 2008,13:57)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">and let me guess... coach hale will be posting here a lot?&#33; </div>
    Let us hope so.

    And maybe Dan...?
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  4. #4
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    Wow...nothing yet???

    I wanted to get something to refer someone here and...nothing&#33;
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  5. #5
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    Training to failure decreases muscle tension
    Jeffery Willardson and colleagues from Eastern Illinois University in Charleston, IL discovered that training to failure was no more useful for increasing muscle endurance than a program with a preset number of sets and reps. Training to failure decreases muscle tension so much that the extra work is no longer useful. Failure training can also be unsafe and even life threatening because it can sabotage muscle tissue. This condition is referred to as rhabdomyolysis. It releases the muscle contents into the blood stream, which can actually cause kidney failure. The popularity of failure training has ignited a small epidemic of rhabdomyolysis in America.

    (International Journal Sports Physiology Performance, 3: 279-293, 2008)
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  6. #6
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    Sample No:1

    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Performance and muscle fiber adaptations to creatine supplementation and heavy resistance training
    [Basic Sciences: Original Investigations]
    VOLEK, JEFF S.; DUNCAN, NOEL D.; MAZZETTI, SCOTT A.; STARON, ROBERT S.; PUTUKIAN, MARGOT; GMEZ, ANA L.; PEARSON, DAVID R.; FINK, WILLIAM J.; KRAEMER, WILLIAM J.

    Laboratory for Sports Medicine/Department of Kinesiology/Center for Sports Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802; The Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306; Department of Biological Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, and School of Physical Therapy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701; and Department of Physiology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA

    Submitted for publication November 1998.

    Accepted for publication January 1999.

    Address for correspondence: William J. Kraemer, Ph.D., Professor/Director, The Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. E-mail: [email protected]

    ABSTRACT
    Performance and muscle fiber adaptations to creatine supplementation and heavy resistance training. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 31, No. 8, pp. 1147-1156, 1999.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of creatine supplementation in conjunction with resistance training on physiological adaptations including muscle fiber hypertrophy and muscle creatine accumulation.

    Methods: Nineteen healthy resistance-trained men were matched and then randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to either a creatine (N = 10) or placebo (N = 9) group. Periodized heavy resistance training was performed for 12 wk. Creatine or placebo capsules were consumed (25 gd-1) for 1 wk followed by a maintenance dose (5 gd-1) for the remainder of the training.

    Results: After 12 wk, significant (P &amp;#8804; 0.05) increases in body mass and fat-free mass were greater in creatine (6.3% and 6.3%, respectively) than placebo (3.6% and 3.1%, respectively) subjects. After 12 wk, increases in bench press and squat were greater in creatine (24% and 32%, respectively) than placebo (16% and 24%, respectively) subjects. Compared with placebo subjects, creatine subjects demonstrated significantly greater increases in Type I (35% vs 11%), IIA (36% vs 15%), and IIAB (35% vs 6%) muscle fiber cross-sectional areas. Muscle total creatine concentrations were unchanged in placebo subjects. Muscle creatine was significantly elevated after 1 wk in creatine subjects (22%), and values remained significantly greater than placebo subjects after 12 wk. Average volume lifted in the bench press during training was significantly greater in creatine subjects during weeks 5-8. No negative side effects to the supplementation were reported.

    Conclusion: Creatine supplementation enhanced fat-free mass, physical performance, and muscle morphology in response to heavy resistance training, presumably mediated via higher quality training sessions.</div>
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    and a little more

    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Essential amino acid and carbohydrate ingestion prior to resistance exercise does not enhance post-exercise muscle protein synthesis.

    Fujita S, Dreyer HC, Drummond MJ, Glynn EL, Volpi E, Rasmussen BB.University of Tokyo. Ingestion of an essential amino acid-carbohydrate (EAA+CHO) solution following resistance exercise enhances muscle protein synthesis during post-exercise recovery. It is unclear whether EAA+CHO ingestion prior to resistance exercise can improve direct measures of post-exercise muscle protein synthesis (FSR; fractional synthetic rate). We hypothesized that EAA+CHO ingestion prior to a bout of resistance exercise would prevent the exercise-induced decrease in muscle FSR and would result in an enhanced rate of muscle FSR during post-exercise recovery. We studied 22 young healthy subjects before, during, and for 2 hr following a bout of high-intensity leg resistance exercise. The Fasting control group (N=11) did not ingest nutrients and the EAA+CHO group (N=11) ingested a solution of EAA+CHO 1 hr prior to beginning the exercise bout. Stable isotopic methods were used in combination with muscle biopsies to determine FSR. Immunoblotting procedures were utilized to assess cell signaling proteins associated with the regulation of FSR. We found that muscle FSR increased in the EAA+CHO group immediately following EAA+CHO ingestion (P&lt;0.05),&gt;0.05). Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 phosphorylation was reduced in both groups at 2 hr post-exercise (EAA+CHO: 39+/-7%; Fasting: 47+/-9%; P&lt;0.05). style=&quot;font-weight: bold;&quot;&gt;

    Conclusion: We conclude that essential amino acids and carbs (EAA+CHO) ingestion prior to resistance exercise does not enhance post-exercise fractional synthesis rate (FSR--Fractional Synthetic Rate--aka rate of adding protein to muscles) as compared to exercise without nutrients.

    My note--while this interesting, I would not dump your protein carb drink before lifting just yet. Based on info from Dave Barr (source, AI and personal conversation) moving it to 15 minutes before training may be more ideal. Stay tuned&#33;</div>

    source: Mike T- Nelson&#39;s ramblings
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  8. #8
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    <div>
    (Fausto @ Jan. 26 2009,8:45)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Training to failure decreases muscle tension
    Jeffery Willardson and colleagues from Eastern Illinois University in Charleston, IL discovered that training to failure was no more useful for increasing muscle endurance than a program with a preset number of sets and reps. Training to failure decreases muscle tension so much that the extra work is no longer useful. Failure training can also be unsafe and even life threatening because it can sabotage muscle tissue. This condition is referred to as rhabdomyolysis. It releases the muscle contents into the blood stream, which can actually cause kidney failure. The popularity of failure training has ignited a small epidemic of rhabdomyolysis in America.

    (International Journal Sports Physiology Performance, 3: 279-293, 2008)</div>
    hmmmmmmm I would really like to see this and his methods of retriving the studies for review.
    Dan
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  9. #9
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    BTW, please post different studies as new topics instead of replys in the forum.
    Dan
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