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Thread: Muscle Recovery vs. Neurologic Recovery

  1. #1
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    I'm looking for literature to support the HST principles of muscle recovery vs. neurologic recovery. Abstracts would suffice as I could get access to a local university reference library if needed.

    I'm not looking to put HST on trial in any way. I'm genuinely intrigued by this particular topic.

    If this is posted in the wrong subforum, mods feel free to move the thread.
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  2. #2
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    A good place to start is by clicking on the "HST" tab on the top right of this page, read the article and the sources sited at the end. There are also lots of newer tests cited throughout this forum. Check out the two research forums on the HST Forum Home site.
    Cowgirls, save a horse; ride an old cowboy! *
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  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply.

    Regarding the "top right" link, I'm sure there's plenty of info in the repeated bout effect studies. Unfortunately, none are clearly cited in that particular article to support 48 hours of muscle recovery vs. 7 days of neurologic recovery when training to failure. Also, the introductory article doesn't go into recovery as in depth as in the FAQ pdf. So I wouldn't expect what I'm looking for to be in that section anyhow.

    I'm seeing plenty of evidence in the hypertrophy research subforums that supports higher frequency to maximize anabolic activity, eccentric loads, etc. But, I must still be overlooking the studies to explain recovery periods.

    There are no related topics in the performance research subforum.

    I'm not giving up. This is a cool topic and I want to learn more
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  4. #4
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    Do a search at pubmed using authors Komi PV, Enoka RM, Bigland-Ritchie B, Gandevia SC, V°llestad NK, Noakes TD, Westerbland H, Sahlin K, Lambert CP
    with any of the keywords, force recovery, fatigue, maximal voluntary contraction and so forth.

    That should give you a pretty good laundry list to start.
    Dan
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  5. #5
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    Good suggestion. I spent a few hours sifting through Pubmed over the weekend but still haven't found evidence to support recovery timeframes.

    I personally find Pubmed serches to be more productive in terms of brainstorming and looking for random new ideas. Honestly, when I'm looking for a specific topic, I rarely find Pubmed to be a useful source especially after doing tons of research in grad school.

    To make my quetion more specific, is there a specific source that was used in the FAQ pdf to support 36-48 hours muscle recovery vs. 5-7 days neurologic recovery? The references are there but the citations are vague. Not complaining about the citations at all. But it's necessary to mention to illustrate that I'm not just fishing for a freebie answer without attempting to find the sources myself.
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  6. #6
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    <div>
    (celc5 @ Nov. 18 2008,12:13)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">is there a specific source that was used in the FAQ pdf to support 36-48 hours muscle recovery vs. 5-7 days neurologic recovery?</div>
    It&#39;s been a long time since I&#39;ve read the faq but I don&#39;t recall this being said (perhaps I&#39;m wrong). What I do recall is 36-48 hours before PS is reverted back to baseline but this is hardly the same as regeneration or repair (days to weeks). It certaintly doesn&#39;t fall under the realm of glycogen resythesis either as that time is much shorter.

    Also even when looking solely at muscle tissue what recovery aspect as we speaking about. The times seen before SR function is returned to normal versus the time seen when EC is restored are vastly different.

    So if you&#39;ll point to the specific location where this is said I may be able to clarify and discuss a little more in depth.

    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">I personally find Pubmed serches to be more productive in terms of brainstorming and looking for random new ideas. Honestly, when I&#39;m looking for a specific topic, I rarely find Pubmed to be a useful source especially after doing tons of research in grad school.</div>Which is why I gave you some specific authors who have looked at the vast array of aspects on contraction recovery. This brief list includes some fantastic reviews on metabolic, neural, contraction coupling, and structural recovery topics.
    Dan
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  7. #7
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    Thanks for an awesome reply. *I&#39;ll get back to the faq again asap so I can specifically site what I&#39;m talking about.

    I completely goofed with the authors. I ran the searches for the keywords but somehow missed the authors list. *Back to Pubmed

    Again, much appreciated bro&#33;



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  8. #8
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    Please give a summary of your findings for those of us who are too lazy to put forth the effort you are willing to do.
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  9. #9
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    I too would be interested in discussing this so as O&amp;G said, get back to us and let&#39;s open up a line of discussion.
    Dan
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  10. #10
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    After rereading the FAQ, I have to correct my assumption that there is a specific statement that deliniates recovery periods.

    A much better description would be that it&#39;s IMPLIED that muscle recovery occurs in the 2 day time period while neurologic recovery when training to failure requires 5-7 days rest.

    The specific statements are more geared toward a 48 hour window of anabolic effect (on multiple levels) and how COMPLETE muscular recovery isn&#39;t necessary to retrain the muscles and enduce further anabolic effect.

    I haven&#39;t explored any further with the Pubmed authors. I plan to do so at some point, but can&#39;t put the time in at the moment.
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