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Thread: Getting Dumbbells into position

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    47

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    I normally perfer to do dumbbell bench press, but as i get up to the 75-85 pound weights, as i rock the weights back and lay on the bench, i have to struggle and loose form to get them into position, if i have a spotter give me the weights im fine, but for the most part im by myself, any suggestions?
    Its only after we've lost everything that were free to do anything.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    5,704

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    You could try power hooks. I've seen them recommended a few times by a couple different people. I haven't tried them myself though... and I don't have a link to any sites for them, but you could try a search I suppose. Or wait for someone who knows what I'm trying to tell you about to come post a link for them.
    PRs:

    Squat - 485 lbs
    Bench - 315 lbs
    Deadlift - 635 lbs
    Total - 1435 lbs
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    286

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    I've seen guys struggle because before they lay back the dumbbells are resting too close to their thighs rather than their knees. This probably isnt your problem. As you know one of the benefits of the dumbbell press is that you don't need a spotter to go heavy so definitely work on getting those dbells in the right position. I have trained with guys that used well over 100 pounds for dbell presses without spotters (I certainly wasnt going to pick them up LOL) and without a problem.

    Good luck

    Joe G
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    154

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    http://www.powerhooks.com/pages/859209/index.htm

    Here is the link for the power hooks. These are the best addition to my gym since my power rack. Can't say enough about them and anyone I have told them about loves them as well.

    Mike
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    476

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    Hi guys,

    I'm not exactly sure why you've got a problem. SHoulder or incline press yes there can be difficulties but for flat press it shouldn't be too hard. I lift one dumbell up onto my thigh (so its 'standing up&#39 and then reach down and grab the other one, when I get on to 90-100lbs I usually ask someone else to lift it up and put it on my knee - not hard for them to do as they can use both hands!!

    Then I lie back and the dumbbells come with me until they're laying partially on my chest, partially being held by my arms, take a few deep breaths to focus and then heave them into the starting position. I had a friend who had trouble with this part because he was putting them into the right position, they need to well balanced with your arm pretty much parallel to your shoulder and your forearm at right angles to your upper arm (i.e. pointing straight up).

    If you already do it like that or still have trouble then I guess a spotter or hooks are the only answer

    cheers

    rob
    nil satis nisi optimum
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    110

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    I'm also in the 80-85 pound range at the moment for the incline press. I just stand in front of the bench, deadlift the weights (one in each hand), sit down - placing each dumbell on a knee and then "kick" forward one bell at a time as I lie back. Both of them are in position by the time my back is against the bench.
    The hardest part for me is getting stabilized, but after the first rep or so, I usually have it under control.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    154

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    Swinging weights up into position is not only very difficult but extremely dangerous and you are eventually asking for an injury. The most common injuries are to the joints of the elbow and shoulders but even more common is the extreme pressure put on the biceps and forearms when swinging the weights up. I have seen so many people wreck their arms for no reason at all. Get the hooks or a spotter and get big. You can add so much more weight with the hooks than you will ever be able to swing into position.

    Mike
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