Alternating workouts

Discussion in 'Hypertrophy-Specific Training (HST)' started by Omega_man, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. Omega_man

    Omega_man New Member

    I'd like some input on this to see if its is a viable concept for HST.
    Can a routine that has a given exercise for each day of the week work based on a M, W, F schedule? This I guess would be considered an A,B,C routine. Would it be better to do as only an A,B instead and alternate only 2 exercises rather than 3?
    Ex: Chest
    M- Bench press, ...............A
    W- Incline Press ...............B
    F- Peck Deck flies (heavy) C
    .
    Shoulders
    M- Shoulder presses .........A
    W- Shrugs .......................B
    F- Up right rows ...............C
    Thx for any help!
     
  2. bskp

    bskp New Member

    1 is better than 2 and 2 is better than 3 because with more exercises you lose the effectiveness of weight progression.
     
  3. jvroig

    jvroig Super Moderator

    Not really. Progression is ok as long as you correctly get your maxes for each exercise. What it affects is neural learning, which may interfere with strength gains. Neural learning is why 1 is better than 2, and 2 is better than 3 when it comes to alternating routines, as you said.
     
  4. Krazay

    Krazay New Member

    neural learning? nerves can learn?
     
  5. abarlament

    abarlament New Member

    What?
     
  6. colby2152

    colby2152 New Member

    Nueral learning = adaptation to the exercise.. simply put if you didn't do bench press for a year (like myself), the load that you would be able to lift wouldn't be as high as you thought until you got back into the swing of things with the exercise, but then again if you have done similar movements such as machines or dips, then there would be no need for such adaptation.
     
  7. Totentanz

    Totentanz Super Moderator Staff Member

    Yes. The central nervous system can learn.
     
  8. brisbanemick

    brisbanemick New Member

    ....so this is why it is a great tool to throw in overload technique like super eccentrics or drop setting from time to time to hit the CNS??
    This helps the CNS adapt to heavy loads to aquire new found strength...is this how the CNS can learn?
     

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