Getting back after a 4 month layoff

Discussion in 'Hypertrophy-Specific Training (HST)' started by j_neatherlin, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. j_neatherlin

    j_neatherlin New Member

    I moved to Atlanta about 4 months ago and I haven't really worked out at all since I've been here. We have a little fitness center at the apartment complex and I go there pretty often, but there's not a whole lot I can do. When I use the machines, I mostly do circuits and dropsets, b/c there just isn't enough weight to do a real workout. I also try to keep up on cardio, so I don't get too fat during my "not-really strategic" deconditioning.

    I've done HST a few times in the past and I like the program quite a bit.

    At this point in my life, my focus isn't on my body, so I basically just want to stay in shape and try to regain some strength (I'd like to get to the point where I can possibly compete in powerlifting again) as I don't have the time or the focus to really be serious about training.

    I've been tossing around the idea of starting some Westside training, but with the 4 month layoff, I think there should be some type of segue from this deconditioned state into that type of training. So, I was thinking about doing a very basic HST set up, based around the "big 3."

    And with all that foundation, here's my question:

    Would it be advisable to jump right into an HST setup and just low-ball my rep maxes? Or should I get back on a basic program for a while until I am no longer in a deconditioned state, test my maxes, decondition, and then start HST?

    I know I've lost quite a bit of strength, but I just don't know how much. I went from doing 345x5 on flat bb press to probably 225x5 (I did get the chance to do some bench work about a month ago).
     
  2. jvroig

    jvroig Super Moderator

    To get the feel of your maxes now, you can just retest them.

    If I were in your shoes, though, I personally would go use light weights (15s or 12s) first, then continue the standard progression from there, perhaps using each weight twice or thrice before incrementing by 5 to 10 pounds.
     

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