boxing-specific weight training

Discussion in 'Strength-Specific Training (SST)' started by Calkid, Feb 15, 2005.

  1. Calkid

    Calkid New Member

    I recently started taking mixed martial arts (MMA)... it's like muy thai/brailian jiu-jitsu/wrestling/me getting exhausted.

    Right now I'm performing the Core Performance workout by Mark Verstegen (google it or amazon it, it's a book)

    Basically designed to be a covers-every-base type workout, to build speed, power, strength, flexibility, and cardio capacity. So far it's been working, especially in the flexibility area.

    However I'm looking for stuff specifically to make my punches stronger and prevent my arms from fatiguing so quickly. For instance, my front delts get tired just holding my arms in stance.

    I do the regular DB presses, trying to make the concentrics explosive. The program also has me follow it up with plyo pushups, which I imagine build punching power. However, what to do about arm endurance? Timed front raise holds? Seems fairly motion-specific but I could use some suggestions.
     
  2. Totentanz

    Totentanz Super Moderator Staff Member

    I'm interested in the same thing. I do Wing Chun Kung Fu, so punching power is extremely important.

    In class, they have us do a lot of punches and other arm movements using weights for long periods, which has increased my punching endurance a lot. I can chain punch for a long time now without feeling burning in my shoulders... however, it doesn't increase power a whole lot.
    I suppose if I used heavier weights where I can only do 10 punches or even less before fatigue is too great might help?

    We do plyo pushups too, which works well enough...

    My teacher recommends building up lat strength, as well as working on the legs a lot, since we do a lot of turning using the hips and such. Any ideas what would be most effective for that?

    I don't know exactly how your art works, but in mine, we need to be able to turn very quickly by shifting weight. So far, squats, leg curls and stuff seem to be working well on my legs for that. The arms are what I'm having difficulty with.
     
  3. Jester

    Jester Well-Known Member

    Endurance is largely neurological I believe. From memory, German Volume Training will help train you for endurance - there's an article amongst Bryan's HST articles that talks about it. I'm sure vicious or dkm could help you out if you ask nicely :)
     
  4. Aaron_F

    Aaron_F New Member

    getting the overall body stronger would be a good start :)

    and boxing training to get some specificity
     
  5. vicious

    vicious New Member

    MMA?!? Cal has intramural UFC?!? :D :D :D :D

    To be honest, I'd just throw on a sh!te load worth of metabolic stress exercises. You wouldn't even need to do HST with it, just do front lateral raise pulses ad nauseum with light weight 4-6 times week.

    In about a month, you'll be able to punch again and again and again with little problem. In general, a lot of metabolic stress work to your core and upper torso. Specificity need not apply there; you just want to create a lot of physiological adaptation to supplement your boxing training.

    Something like . . .

    1) Front lateral raises, pulse-style. 40-60 reps cluster-style. Increase density every day. Add some weight periodically.

    2) Machine pullover, pulse-style

    3) Nelson situp. 20-40 reps or so.

    4) Leg extension, pulse-style.

    5) Leg curl, pulse-style.

    As for explosive bench presses, don't bother with that unless you have access to chains or bands.

    cheers,
    Jules
     
  6. Calkid

    Calkid New Member

    What about bench tosses on the smitch machine? there's a way to easily and safely train explosively without chains or bands
    and no, I WISH it was the RSF... wouldn't have to pay private gym fees ;)
     
  7. vicious

    vicious New Member

    Not training in the RSF? Hmm, do you have access to Hammer or Nautilus equipment? Those more or less emulate the strength curve of chains/bands.

    In order to add a "stabilization" element, take a couple of towels or socks and wrap them around each parallel grip. This forces you to grip harder, which would emulate the neural drive of a true bench press. Perform them explosively. The variable resistance will pack on a lot of load toward the end.

    No, seriously, this is really all you need to do to make most machines almost as effective as free weights.

    cheers,
    Jules
     

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