Myoreps + Cns Burnout

Discussion in 'General Training' started by _Simon_, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Active Member

    Thought I'd post a fresh thread about this. It's necessarily only about my experience, but burnout in general.

    I just don't know if I can perform myoreps anymore... most times I do myoreps, it's almost guaranteed that the next day I'll have a cold. It just keeps happening constantly, and it just leads me to think its hammering/depressing my CNS too much.

    I even decreased my myoreps frequency to just one day a week, and only using it on 2x exercises, and the last workout I did I tried to push to 5 mini sets, and boom, sick!

    I did notice that when I only did maybe only 2 or 3 of the minisets I'd be okay... but anytime I push to 4 or 5 and the body just doesn't tolerate them. Thinking I was perhaps just not performing them correctly, I've been really focusing a great deal on making sure I'm not going to absolute complete failure, just ending the set when the rep is noticeably slower and a bit 'grindy'... but same outcome.

    Which is a darn shame as I love the method so much... unless I just really ramp up the Vitamin C, garlic and antioxidants if I want to train them haha.

    Am trying to think of a compromise... perhaps if I do 2x normal sets (normal rest time in between) and after the second set, do 2-3 mini "myo" sets...?

    Eg.

    Set 1, I hit 20 reps
    (Take a normal 1 minute rest in between or so)
    Set 2, 16 reps + 5 + 5 + 5


    Whaddya think, good compromise that won't hammer my CNS?

    (And any other tips anyone has for avoiding CNS burnout/getting sick easily from hard training sessions? Obviously there are many more life factors and variables at hand and not just training..)
     
  2. mickc1965

    mickc1965 Well-Known Member

    How many exercises per muscle group?
     
  3. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Active Member

    So I've been training with Dips and Chins as a main focus twice a week, along with myoreps for bis and tris, but splitting it all up into three days a week (so 2-3 exercises per those musclegroups throughout the entire week, but just maintenance stuff for the rest).

    So

    DAY 1
    Lower volume DIPS + CHINS
    Myoreps TRIS + BIS
    (CHEST high-rep)
    (Leg extensions)

    DAY 2
    Higher volume DIPS
    BIS (just a higher-rep stretch/metabolic move)
    (REAR DELTS)
    (Leg extensions)

    DAY 3
    Higher volume CHINS
    (CHEST a few heavier sets)
    TRIs (high-rep stretch)
    (DELTS)

    And I would progress in weight for dips and chins, the lower volume day is where I'd up the weight, then the slightly higher volume day would be the same weight but more volume, was a fun way to progress.

    But regardless of this cycle, prior ones I've had the same experience with when I did myoreps. Unless overall there was too much going on in my routines that were draining, but wouldn't think so as I've really toned everything down alot the past year.
     
  4. mickc1965

    mickc1965 Well-Known Member

    Are you eating and sleeping enough?
     
  5. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Active Member

    Eating has been really good, sleeping has been okay and not exactly bad overall, but honestly could improve a little.. I'll definitely try to improve there
     
  6. Totentanz

    Totentanz Super Moderator Staff Member

    Are you using one of the templates Borge supplied?

    Most of them have you only doing myo style reps like one or two workouts a week. I think doing them every single workout can be a bit much if you aren't eating a lot and making sure you get enough sleep. I'm on a cut and only doing them one day a week for the bigger lifts.
     
  7. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Active Member

    Yeah in my previous cycle I was doing them as per Borge's template. This cycle I was originally doing them twice a week (and by twice a week, I mean just on two exercises total, on two different days), but now was doing those two exercises just once a week myoreps style.

    I just wonder its effect on suppressing/depressing the CNS. That many reps at that 'grindy' level, otherwise it may just be me, or I'm learning about my particular tolerances.

    So I was thinking of a few options:

    1) Obviously look into my diet, sleep, rest etc.

    2) Be very aware that I'm not pushing to absolute failure on myos (monitor my rep quality carefully). So an RPE of 9 or even 8?

    3) Limit the amount of mini-sets (to 3 or maybe 4 max). Also limit frequency of doing myoreps to once a week, medium-heavier training other days.

    4) Do a normal set first, normal rest, after the second set add in 2-3 mini-sets (as I pondered in my OP)
     
  8. Totentanz

    Totentanz Super Moderator Staff Member

    Which lifts are you doing them for? Myo-reps, in my experience, are much better suited for machines and cable lifts, or isos that use DBs. With things like curls or leg extensions, stuff like that, I'd highly recommend doing single-limb exercises rather than both limbs at once.

    I totally get the burnout you're talking about. I can usually feel when I'm pushing the edge of too much to where I'm risking getting sick. When that happens, I dial it back a bit and also make sure to go to sleep much earlier than usual.

    Do you track your sleep? Like with a fitbit or similar? If not, you may want to look into it. You may be under the impression that you're getting eight hours of sleep, but you're actually only getting 6 hours or less. It's important to compensate for that kind of thing if that is the case.

    I don't go to RPE 9 on myo sets, except maybe the very last mini set. This let me get in all 5 mini sets usually. Once a rep gets grindy, I stop the set. Something else you can do with some lifts is shorten the range of motion just a tad to keep constant tension on the muscle, which can enhance the 'myo' effect plus allow you to use lighter loads, which means more long term progression before you will eventually run out of weight to add.

    tl;dr - don't go as close to failure and do them only on smaller lifts or isos.
     
    _Simon_ likes this.
  9. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Active Member

    Brilliant, that's super helpful, thanks mate.

    For this cycle I was only doing them on EZ bar reverse spider curls, and EZ bar Skullcrushers. I have done them for bench press in the past, but makes sense to keep them for isos (some can do it for sure, but maybe for me it'd be overkill for the CNS). And interesting trying it with single-limb exercises... is that just to keep a proper focus on what you're doing?

    No I don't track my sleep but that is an idea. It's up and down usually, especially with crazy hot weather. I often find myself feeling really tired in the mornings, I don't get how some people feel energized haha.

    Ah ok cool, so perhaps I push it a bit hard possibly... I usually cut the set when the rep speed is noticeably slower than the previous rep. I usually do shorten the ROM to really keep constant tension. I guess it was my understanding from reading the e-book that the idea is that those grindy reps are the 'effective reps'. Just not sure how 'grindy' they need to be...

    Will keep all that in mind for sure, cheers :)
     
  10. NWlifter

    NWlifter Active Member

    Wow when I did myo , I did them for every freaken exercise. Squats, bench, rows, all of them. So many do regular rest pause with compounds, can't see why myo reps would be different?

    I agree on non failure. Failure does nothing good, but sure hampers recovery.
     
  11. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Active Member

    Ah yeah, I've tended to use them on lifts that are fairly stationary and lifts that aren't as complex. I think the more complex the lift the more danger you're in as you're reaching and dealing with alot of fatigue.

    Unsure how other rest-pause methods are done, I thought they were longer rests than are done in myoreps.
     
  12. NWlifter

    NWlifter Active Member

    Ah ok
    There are a few versions of rest pause, back in the 90's I used to do just non failure rest pause, I'd do a set to almost failure rest for 10 seconds, rest pause, rest for 10 seconds. Turns out it was very similar to myo-reps, but I know some others use to use like 20 seconds for rest pause.
     
    _Simon_ likes this.

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