Training with elastic bands gave up to

Discussion in 'Performance Research' started by abanger, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. abanger

    abanger Member

    The effects of combining elastic and free weight resistance on strength and power in athletes.
    <div>
    (Borge Fagerli @ Jun. 15 2008,9:54)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">As illustrated and discussed in the bench press article, we see here how effective training with elastic band around the rod can be. Over 7 weeks of training was three times greater strength increases in the squat and double-strength increase in bench press in the group that trained the combination of elastic bands + &quot;standard&quot; strength, compared with the group who trained without elastic bands!


    J Strength Cond Res. 2008 Mar; 22 (2) :567-74.

    The effects of combining elastic and free weight resistance Wed strength and power in athletes.

    Anderson CE, Sforzo GA, Sigg JA.

    Exercise and Sport Sciences, Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York, USA.

    This study was under taken to determine whether combined elastic and free weight resistance (CR) provides different strength and power adaptations than free weight resistance (FWR) training alone. Forty-four young (age 20 + / - 1 years), resistance-trained (4 + / - 2 years' experience) subjects were recruited from men's basketball and wrestling teams and women's basketball and hockey teams at Cornell University. Subjects were stratified according to team, then Randomly assigned to the control (C, n = 21) or experimental group (E, n = 23). Before and after 7 weeks of resistance training, subjects were tested for lean body mass, 1 repetition maximum back squat and bench press, and peak and average power. Both C and E groups performed identical workouts except that E used CR (ie, elastic resistance) for the back squat and bench press, whereas the C group used FWR alone. CR was performed using an elastic bungee cord attached to a standard Barbell loaded with plates. Elastic tension was accounted for in an attempt two equalize the total work done by each group. Statistical analysis revealed significant (P &lt;0.05) between-group differences after training. Compared with C, improvement of E was nearly three times greater for the back squat (16.47 + / - 5.67 vs. 6.84 + / - 4.42 kg increase), two times greater for bench press (6.68 + / - 3.41 vs. 3.34 + / -- 2.67 kg increase), and nearly three times greater for the average power (68.55 + / - 84.35 vs. 23.66 + / - 40.56 watt increase). Training with CR may be better than FWR alone for developing lower and upper body strength, and lower body power in resistance-trained individuals. Long-term effects are unclear, but CR training makes a meaningful contribution in the short term two performance adaptations of experienced athletes.</div>
     
  2. Lol

    Lol Super Moderator Staff Member

    I wonder whether training with bands equates with adding a set of heavy partials (using a heavier load over reduced ROM)? Ie. if I've understood the method used correctly, the CR group is effectively using more load (and therefore doing extra work) through the strong ROM than the FWR group, so it may be possible for the FWR group to get similar strength improvements to the CR group by performing some extra partials with extra load (equivalent to max band tension).
     
  3. quadancer

    quadancer New Member

    So all you need is a Bowflex for tha Beeg Mossels! [​IMG]

    ...anyways, it explains all the chains and bands in PL gyms, except that their main focus in the use of them is for sticking points, not overall strength. They develop that by lifting heavy *** weights!
     
  4. <div>
    (Lol @ Nov. 24 2009,5:19)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">I wonder whether training with bands equates with adding a set of heavy partials (using a heavier load over reduced ROM)? Ie. if I've understood the method used correctly, the CR group is effectively using more load (and therefore doing extra work) through the strong ROM than the FWR group, so it may be possible for the FWR group to get similar strength improvements to the CR group by performing some extra partials with extra load (equivalent to max band tension).</div>
    Lol, from the quote above:
    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Elastic tension was accounted for in an attempt two equalize the total work done by each group.</div>

    It seems they tried to equate both groups so that the difference shown is a result of a different mechanism. Maybe the equalization was not &quot;fair&quot; and didn't account for the extra elastic strength at full stretch (of the band) although that would be a silly mistake by them.
     
  5. Lol

    Lol Super Moderator Staff Member

    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Elastic tension was accounted for in an attempt to equalize the total work done by each group.</div>

    OK, thanks electric, I missed that rather important sentence. It would seem a fairly difficult thing to get right. It would have been nice to know exactly what the set up was and what force measurements were taken.
     
  6. abanger

    abanger Member

    Training with elastic bands more efficiently

    Alterations in Speed of Squat Movement and the Use of Accommodated Resistance Among College Athletes Training for Power.

     
  7. aa7

    aa7 New Member

    Bumping an old thread :)

    How exactly would this have been set up? I'm interested in buying these elastic bungee cords (but not sure where...), and I'm unsure just how they used them. Were they attatched to the floor?
     
  8. grunt11

    grunt11 New Member

    It depends on the exercise you are using them for how to set them up. For Bench Press they usually go under the bench and attach to the bar near or wrapped under your hands depending on the type. Check out YouTube for videos of how people set them up for Benching, Squatting etc. . . .

    You can buy them on Amazon. Also, my local Play-it-Again sports sells a couple types of them but I’m not sure if your local fitness stores in the UK will have them.
     

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