Absence of Post-WO Nutrition & Atrophy/Hypertrophy

Discussion in 'Strength-Specific Training (SST)' started by colby2152, Jan 29, 2008.

  1. colby2152

    colby2152 New Member

    First off, this goes into the strength section because my goal for a part of my body is the lack of hypertrophy. I am training 100% for strength (or at least as much as I can).

    Is post workout nutrition really that necessary when someone is not training for hypertrophy? Another question about post-WO nutrition is why such a significance of it when pre-WO nutrition is a substantial enough of protein immediately prior to the WO?
     
  2. quadancer

    quadancer New Member

    I can't answer the first part, but protein synthesis is elevated post workout.
     
  3. Aaron_F

    Aaron_F New Member

    Eat something around training.
     
  4. lcars

    lcars New Member

    i would say that the correct pre and post workout nutrition is essential, wether it be for strength or hypertrophy.

    for strength training, recovery remains just as important, so getting the right"food" in there is important.
     
  5. colby2152

    colby2152 New Member

    <div>
    (lcars @ Feb. 01 2008,13:10)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">i would say that the correct pre and post workout nutrition is essential, wether it be for strength or hypertrophy.

    for strength training, recovery remains just as important, so getting the right&quot;food&quot; in there is important.</div>
    That's what I seem to be gathering, and even though the Squat and Deadlift are compound movements that also work up my upper body (arms, lats, abs, traps), I am going to experiment with no post-WO nutrition on my leg days. The weights are currently light right now (45/135 lbs going up 5lbs each week), so this experiment is viable in the short run for hypertrophy reasons. I imagine that the light loads will keep me away from atrophy, but will prevent hypertrophy.
     
  6. XFatMan

    XFatMan New Member

    What you're doing is closer to powerlifting than bodybuilding. There is not much difference between bodybuilder and powerlifter nutrition. That's why modern powerlifters usually look like off-season bodybuilders and not like little monsters such as Benedikt Magnusson.

    There are tons of articles on the topic out there, but I found the Power Nutrition - Questions and Answers series by Anthony Ricciuto very useful. These twelve parts are a huge read but definitely worth the time and effort.
     
  7. Aaron_F

    Aaron_F New Member

    Modern powerlifters lifting in open styled federations look like off season bbrs because they are allowed the same drug regimine, if they wish.,

    Anthony has some interesting things, but some of the stuff he comes out with falls onto the batshit crazy side of the fence
     
  8. XFatMan

    XFatMan New Member

    Yes, you're right. I have become so careful when reading bodybuilding / powerlifting stuff that I can feel whether the author really knows the stuff or whether he / she is just parroting what others say. Still, you can get something good out of it.
     
  9. lcars

    lcars New Member

    <div>
    (colby2152 @ Feb. 01 2008,13:50)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE"><div>
    (lcars @ Feb. 01 2008,13:10)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">i would say that the correct pre and post workout nutrition is essential, wether it be for strength or hypertrophy.

    for strength training, recovery remains just as important, so getting the right&quot;food&quot; in there is important.</div>
    That's what I seem to be gathering, and even though the Squat and Deadlift are compound movements that also work up my upper body (arms, lats, abs, traps), I am going to experiment with no post-WO nutrition on my leg days.  The weights are currently light right now (45/135 lbs going up 5lbs each week), so this experiment is viable in the short run for hypertrophy reasons.  I imagine that the light loads will keep me away from atrophy, but will prevent hypertrophy.</div>
    i know its down to the individual, but im having a hard time understanding why you wish to stop or avoid hypertrophy, if you grow while training for strength then the body needs this growth to support the strength gains you are making,the gains will eventually slow or stop once your body reaches the required size to move the load efficiently.


    one thing i underestimated the importance of over the years is diet. eat and keep eating.
     
  10. QuantumPositron

    QuantumPositron New Member

    I agree with Lcars. Hypertrophy is a necessary component of strength. Westside Barbell incorporates hypertrophy-specific training into their weekly program. More hypertrophy = more contractile units = greater potential to develop tension. That's not my personal pseudo-reasoning. Its undisputable fact.

    If you're trying to stay at the same weight then lose bodyfat, make up the difference in muscle, and use neuromuscular training techniques to improve explosiveness and motor unit recruitment. This will translate into greater relative strength. But to maximize absolute strength, you will want hypertrophy
     

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