Cross-Contamination of Nutritional Supplements

Discussion in 'Anything and Everything about dietary supplements' started by Bulldog, Jun 24, 2008.

  1. Bulldog

    Bulldog Active Member

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18563865?dopt=AbstractPlus

    I knew this was a potential problem.  But this seems worse than I would have expected it to be.  15% seems pretty high.  I also wonder how much of the "cross-contamination" isn't actually contamination, but actually done on purpose.

    I wonder if athletes would test positive for steroids when using the contaminated supplements.  Do you think the contamination is high enough to put someone over the levels they test for?
     
  2. EL_VIEJO

    EL_VIEJO New Member

    <div>
    (Bulldog @ Jun. 24 2008,3:24)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE"> I also wonder how much of the &quot;cross-contamination&quot; isn't actually contamination, but actually done on purpose.</div>
    I heard about this for the 1st time a few months ago. &quot;Cross-contamination&quot; is a nice euphemism for purposely adding AAS and/or other substances to a supplement so the supplement will have a visible effect. In other words, the supplement is probably useless without the &quot;cross-contamination&quot;.

    I just saw a very interesting documentary on steroids called, &quot;Bigger, Stronger Faster&quot;. There's a short segment on supplements, but they don't really touch on the &quot;cross-contamination&quot; issue. They do, however touch on the supplement advertisements.
     

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