KAATSU training

Discussion in 'Hypertrophy Research' started by pete69, Jun 5, 2008.

  1. pete69

    pete69 New Member

    Anyone take a look at the full text of these? Dan? It appears there is more and more positive research in this area, although I wonder how much it would benefit experienced lifters.

    Having fooled around with torniquete training, in the very short term, there is a ridiculous pump that carries over well into the next day that at least temporarily enhances size in my arms.

    Ischemic strength training: a low-load alternative to heavy resistance exercise?
    Wernbom M, Augustsson J, Raastad T.

    Lundberg Laboratory for Human Muscle Function and Movement Analysis, Department of Orthopaedics, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.

    Strength training with low loads in combination with vascular occlusion has been proposed as an alternative to heavy resistance exercise in the rehabilitation setting, especially when high forces acting upon the musculo-skeletal system are contraindicated. Several studies on low-to-moderate intensity resistance exercise combined with cuff occlusion have demonstrated increases in muscle strength and size that are comparable to those typically seen after conventional high-load strength training. However, the physiological mechanisms by which occlusion training induces increased muscle mass and strength are currently unclear, although several candidate stimuli have been proposed. Also, the long-term safety, practicality, and efficacy of this training method are still controversial. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that in some instances, tourniquet cuffs may not be necessary for relative ischemia and significant training effects to occur with resistance exercise at low-to-moderate loads. The aims of the present review are to summarize current opinion and knowledge regarding the physiology of ischemic strength training and to discuss some of the training and health aspects of this type of exercise. In addition, suggestions for further research are given.

    Cross-transfer effects of resistance training with blood flow restriction.
    Madarame H, Neya M, Ochi E, Nakazato K, Sato Y, Ishii N.

    Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan. [email protected]

    PURPOSE: This study investigated whether muscle hypertrophy-promoting effects are cross-transferred in resistance training with blood flow restriction, which has been shown to evoke strong endocrine activation. METHODS: Fifteen untrained men were randomly assigned into the occlusive training group (OCC, N = 8) and the normal training group (NOR, N = 7). Both groups performed the same unilateral arm exercise (arm curl) at 50% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) without occlusion (three sets, 10 repetitions). Either the dominant or nondominant arm was randomly chosen to be trained (OCC-T, NOR-T) or to serve as a control (OCC-C, NOR-C). After the arm exercise, OCC performed leg exercise with blood flow restriction (30% of 1RM, three sets, 15-30 repetitions), whereas NOR performed the same leg exercise without occlusion. The training session was performed twice a week for 10 wk. In a separate set of experiments, acute changes in blood hormone concentrations were measured after the same leg exercises with (N = 5) and without (N = 5) occlusion. RESULTS: Cross-sectional area (CSA) and isometric torque of elbow flexor muscles increased significantly in OCC-T, whereas no significant changes were observed in OCC-C, NOR-T, and NOR-C. CSA and isometric torque of thigh muscles increased significantly in OCC, whereas no significant changes were observed in NOR. Noradrenaline concentration showed a significantly larger increase after leg exercise with occlusion than after exercises without occlusion, though growth hormone and testosterone concentrations did not show significant differences between these two types of exercises. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that low-intensity resistance training increases muscular size and strength when combined with resistance exercise with blood flow restriction for other muscle groups. It was suggested that any circulating factor(s) was involved in this remote effect of exercise on muscular size.
     
  2. pete69

    pete69 New Member

    Comparison of hormone responses following light resistance exercise with partial vascular occlusion and moderately difficult resistance exercise without occlusion

    http://jap.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/101/6/1616

    This one is the full text. The growth hormone effect is considerably greater with the occlusion training, but it doesn't appear to be b/c of lactate production as is often suggested (Poliquin, etc). Even though serum GH is overrated, perhaps it would be beneficial to add this to the end of a workout for fat loss purposes. Get your heavy loading and finish with some kaatsu training for 2-3 sets of 15-30 reps.
     
  3. Aaron_F

    Aaron_F New Member

    Full body KAATSU ftw
     
  4. scientific muscle

    scientific muscle New Member

    <div>
    (Aaron_F @ Jun. 05 2008,9:06)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Full body KAATSU ftw</div>
    Tourniquet on the neck? [​IMG]
     
  5. pete69

    pete69 New Member

    [​IMG]

    How Bruce Campbell got jacked up for Army of Darkness. KAATSU! He was so ahead of his time, brilliant actor AND trainer.
     
  6. the_dark_master

    the_dark_master New Member

    You've already got full-body Kaatsu aka the squat. [​IMG]
     
  7. quadancer

    quadancer New Member

    Haha! NO KIDDIN! Deads ain't far behind!
     
  8. dkm1987

    dkm1987 New Member

    <div>
    (pete69 @ Jun. 05 2008,11:29)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Anyone take a look at the full text of these? Dan? It appears there is more and more positive research in this area, although I wonder how much it would benefit experienced lifters.

    Having fooled around with torniquete training, in the very short term, there is a ridiculous pump that carries over well into the next day that at least temporarily enhances size in my arms.

    Ischemic strength training: a low-load alternative to heavy resistance exercise?
    Wernbom M, Augustsson J, Raastad T.

    Lundberg Laboratory for Human Muscle Function and Movement Analysis, Department of Orthopaedics, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.

    Strength training with low loads in combination with vascular occlusion has been proposed as an alternative to heavy resistance exercise in the rehabilitation setting, especially when high forces acting upon the musculo-skeletal system are contraindicated. Several studies on low-to-moderate intensity resistance exercise combined with cuff occlusion have demonstrated increases in muscle strength and size that are comparable to those typically seen after conventional high-load strength training. However, the physiological mechanisms by which occlusion training induces increased muscle mass and strength are currently unclear, although several candidate stimuli have been proposed. Also, the long-term safety, practicality, and efficacy of this training method are still controversial. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that in some instances, tourniquet cuffs may not be necessary for relative ischemia and significant training effects to occur with resistance exercise at low-to-moderate loads. The aims of the present review are to summarize current opinion and knowledge regarding the physiology of ischemic strength training and to discuss some of the training and health aspects of this type of exercise. In addition, suggestions for further research are given.

    Cross-transfer effects of resistance training with blood flow restriction.
    Madarame H, Neya M, Ochi E, Nakazato K, Sato Y, Ishii N.

    Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan. [email protected]

    PURPOSE: This study investigated whether muscle hypertrophy-promoting effects are cross-transferred in resistance training with blood flow restriction, which has been shown to evoke strong endocrine activation. METHODS: Fifteen untrained men were randomly assigned into the occlusive training group (OCC, N = 8) and the normal training group (NOR, N = 7). Both groups performed the same unilateral arm exercise (arm curl) at 50% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) without occlusion (three sets, 10 repetitions). Either the dominant or nondominant arm was randomly chosen to be trained (OCC-T, NOR-T) or to serve as a control (OCC-C, NOR-C). After the arm exercise, OCC performed leg exercise with blood flow restriction (30% of 1RM, three sets, 15-30 repetitions), whereas NOR performed the same leg exercise without occlusion. The training session was performed twice a week for 10 wk. In a separate set of experiments, acute changes in blood hormone concentrations were measured after the same leg exercises with (N = 5) and without (N = 5) occlusion. RESULTS: Cross-sectional area (CSA) and isometric torque of elbow flexor muscles increased significantly in OCC-T, whereas no significant changes were observed in OCC-C, NOR-T, and NOR-C. CSA and isometric torque of thigh muscles increased significantly in OCC, whereas no significant changes were observed in NOR. Noradrenaline concentration showed a significantly larger increase after leg exercise with occlusion than after exercises without occlusion, though growth hormone and testosterone concentrations did not show significant differences between these two types of exercises. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that low-intensity resistance training increases muscular size and strength when combined with resistance exercise with blood flow restriction for other muscle groups. It was suggested that any circulating factor(s) was involved in this remote effect of exercise on muscular size.</div>
    Pete,

    email me [email protected]
     

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