Missed my lift

Discussion in 'Strength-Specific Training (SST)' started by TunnelRat, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. Lol

    Lol Super Moderator Staff Member

    <div>
    (TunnelRat @ Apr. 15 2008,5:10)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">I had an MRI done on Monday. Today the doctor said there was no need to do an EMG -- the MRI results were so bad there is no need for further testing.  Apparently my infraspinatus and suprapinatus are barely hanging on by a thread. There is a 4.5 cm gap in my rotator cuff and it's not clear that it can be fixed.  [​IMG]</div>
    Hey TR,

    Sorry to hear about the results from your MRI scan.

    If your infraspinauts and suprapinatus are barely hanging on by a thread surely that's bad enough to require some form of key hole surgery to sort out? I know that, if left unattended, this kind of thing can make reattachment of tendon insertions more problematic. What has been suggested? Can it really be OK to keep up the chins, rows, dips and bench without exacerbating the situation? I am just a bit cynical about some of the flippant comments made by GPs; did the guy know what sort of loads you are lifting when he said this?

    Anyway, I really hope it is safe for you to keep up the main upper-body lifts.

    Have a pleasant and restful SD - you've earned it.
     
  2. TunnelRat

    TunnelRat Active Member

    <div>
    (Lol @ Apr. 16 2008,3:21)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">If your infraspinauts and suprapinatus are barely hanging on by a thread surely that's bad enough to require some form of key hole surgery to sort out? I know that, if left unattended, this kind of thing can make reattachment of tendon insertions more problematic. What has been suggested? Can it really be OK to keep up the chins, rows, dips and bench without exacerbating the situation? I am just a bit cynical about some of the flippant comments made by GPs; did the guy know what sort of loads you are lifting when he said this?</div>
    This doctor is a specialist; I had to get a referral from my regular doctor in order to get in to see him. He's a phsysiologist or something and is supposed to know about how the body responds to physical exercise.

    He told me I might want to consult a surgeon to see if any further repairs can be made. However, in the meantime I can continue to do exercises that do not involve external rotation, as those are the ones that particularly affect the supraspinatus and infraspinatus.

    I am making plans to contact a surgeon shortly. I'm not sure what, if anything, can be done. I just had surgery on that shoulder in 2003... [​IMG]
     
  3. Lol

    Lol Super Moderator Staff Member

    I realise that must be frustrating for you but seeing the surgeon sounds like a good idea. My mother injured a shoulder in a fall and it wasn't attended to properly by the medical staff who examined her at the time (well, she wasn't given a scan and she wasn't given the correct advice; she was just told to rest it etc.). A year later, still finding that her shoulder wasn't a whole lot better and still with greatly reduced mobility, she had a proper scan which revealed some pretty serious tendon damage. The surgeon she saw recently said that it will now be very difficult to improve her situation because where the tendons have become detached and frayed they have atrophied. So she's left with a few threads of tendon holding on to the bone and the prospects of it remaining that way for the foreseeable future.

    I hope your situation works out better than this. I realise that you have had an op already and are probably not keen for them to mess about with it again but I would still hope that the surgeon can help you considering the kind of training you are doing now.

    All the best.
     
  4. colby2152

    colby2152 New Member

    If you do end up having surgery on your shoulder, then I am more than ready to try to develop a routine for you. Back to machines it would have to be, and mostly upper body. Best of luck TR!
     
  5. TunnelRat

    TunnelRat Active Member

    <div>
    (Lol @ Apr. 17 2008,10:52)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">she had a proper scan which revealed some pretty serious tendon damage. The surgeon she saw recently said that it will now be very difficult to improve her situation because where the tendons have become detached and frayed they have atrophied. So she's left with a few threads of tendon holding on to the bone and the prospects of it remaining that way for the foreseeable future.</div>
    Yup, that's about what I've been told. It turns out the guy is a physiatrist (!) (not a physiologist) and he says the tendons are only holding on by a very little bit.
    <div>
    (colby2152 @ Apr. 17 2008,11:54)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">If you do end up having surgery on your shoulder, then I am more than ready to try to develop a routine for you.  Back to machines it would have to be, and mostly upper body.  Best of luck TR</div>
    Thank you kindly, I may need to take you up on that.

    In other news: I went in today to have my semi-annual body fat analysis. I am down to 9.4% -- Single Digit Body Fat....!!!!  [​IMG]

    That's just in time for me to begin eating when a start a new cycle next week (this week I am still in Spontaneous Decompression).
     

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