Muscle Memory

Discussion in 'Hypertrophy Research' started by Lol, Jun 3, 2008.

  1. Lol

    Lol Super Moderator Staff Member

    When a muscle has been hypertrophied and is then allowed to atrophy, what, if any, are the mechanisms by which hypertrophy is able to reoccur at a faster rate than originally? ie. what really is Muscle Memory in the context of muscle hypertrophy?

    When I searched for an answer I came across this article by Bryan (of all people!) which goes some way to explaining the phenomenon, but the article has to be a few years old as it was part of the second Think Muscle newsletter. Can anything now be added to this to confirm the ideas Bryan mentioned in the article?

    Muscle Memory: Scientists May Have Unwittingly Uncovered Its Mystery

    I am sure some of you will have read that before but I hadn't. In view of what is said there, would it not be the case that lean muscle mass lost during a cut would be more readily regained (than when the muscles were originally hypertrophied) and therefore lead to an improved P-ratio? ie. you'd gain back lost lean mass with a comparably lower increase in fat.

    Thoughts? Studies?
     
  2. I realize this doesn't pertain to p-ratio & whatnot. But I think weightlifting leads to increased bone density which correlates w/ muscle strength.

    so...if a fella lifts, bone density increases, which correlates w/ muscular strength. greater strength leads to heavier loads which leads to hypertrophy.

    just my two cents, I'm sure there are a millon factors...

    http://www.springerlink.com/content/k277777288565tq2/
    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">In ex-weight lifters 50–64 years of age, the BMD was greater than in controls. After 65 years, no difference was found between the former weight lifters and their controls.</div>


    http://www.acsm-msse.org/pt....!-1
    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">The BMD values for the junior lifters were found to be significantly greater at all sites for the junior weightlifters compared with their age-matched control group.</div>
     
  3. dkm1987

    dkm1987 New Member

    <div>
    (Lol @ Jun. 03 2008,5:03)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">When a muscle has been hypertrophied and is then allowed to atrophy, what, if any, are the mechanisms by which hypertrophy is able to reoccur at a faster rate than originally? ie. what really is Muscle Memory in the context of muscle hypertrophy?

    When I searched for an answer I came across this article by Bryan (of all people!) which goes some way to explaining the phenomenon, but the article has to be a few years old as it was part of the second Think Muscle newsletter. Can anything now be added to this to confirm the ideas Bryan mentioned in the article?

    Muscle Memory: Scientists May Have Unwittingly Uncovered Its Mystery

    I am sure some of you will have read that before but I hadn't. In view of what is said there, would it not be the case that lean muscle mass lost during a cut would be more readily regained (than when the muscles were originally hypertrophied) and therefore lead to an improved P-ratio? ie. you'd gain back lost lean mass with a comparably lower increase in fat.

    Thoughts? Studies?</div>
    The myosin shifting that Bryan points is one aspect but it does not explain the hypertrophic changes that occur with a detrained/retrained state.

    Another study looking at sattellite cells may provide a clearer explanation. In which subjects trained, detrained and sat cell where examined in both conditions. What they saw was that the training period increased the available sat pool without any increase in nuclei donation. During the detraiing period it took quite a while for the sat cell pool to shrink. This elevated count of sat cells, ready and able to provide their nucleus if/when needed, could explain the rapid hypertrophy seen after a layoff. Because IMO it would take less of time for homeostatis to cause donation, increasing the CSA for the fibers.
     
  4. If you believe the fascial stretching supporters, they claim (part of the) muscle memory comes from the fact that previous muscle size already increased the fascia surrounding muscle fibers and without the fascia restraining muscle fiber growth, it can occur fast until previous size when it reaches fascia size.
    This might be complete bs but I thought of mentioning it for discussion.
     
  5. dkm1987

    dkm1987 New Member

    Never bought into the whole &quot;bag theory&quot;.
     

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