how many meals a day?

Discussion in 'Diet & Nutrition' started by bomsu, Sep 9, 2005.

  1. Coffee+milk
    Breakfast
    Coffee+milk
    Coffee+milk
    Snack
    Coffee+milk
    Lunch
    Juice
    Coffee+milk
    Snack
    Coffee+milk
    Red Bull
    PreWorkout Shake
    Water
    PostWorkout Shake
    Dinner
    Fruit
    Sausage

    Yeah.. I think that's pretty much it durring weekdays. maybe 3 more 10gram chokolat chip cookies before bed.
     
  2. jvroig

    jvroig Super Moderator

    I usually eat only canned foods - easy to prepare, convenient, not very expensive.

    For the last 4-5 months (I'm not kidding here), I've been eating canned tuna packed in soya oil. 3 of those a day on weekdays, then 2 on weekends (or sometimes just 1 because some other food is prepared for me). I must have eaten over 400 of those canned tuna for the last months. Now, for the coming new year, my taste buds have revolted (but due to the high conent of good fats, mainly due to soya oil, I must have knocked 150 points from my cholesterol [​IMG]). Now I'll just be eating a can a day of that tuna, then add in a can or two of chicken chunks, then ham maybe. And peanut butter sandwiches, quick and easy to prepare too.

    Aside from merely trying to get the total number of calories, I'm aiming for more frequent eating. A quote from Lyle McDonald:
    So no more big meals from me - some months ago, I actually could consume 3000 calories in just 3 meals - canned tuna in soya oil was 420 calories; bread or rice, enough to get 400 calories; then sprinkle with enough peanuts to get 250 calories. I used to eat that per sitting, so I get 1000+ calories per meal, so I ate only 3 meals a day (I just didn't have time to eat more frequently, so I really had no choice but to eat a lot per sitting).

    Now that I have more time for myself, I'm going to get in more meals. And start more strictly monitoring my diet.
     
  3. faz

    faz Active Member

    what do you class as meals ...would you class a pre and post shake as one of your daily meals..what about a banana and a handfull of nuts is that a meal..i eat three main meals a day but i have fruit and nuts as well.
     
  4. choco

    choco New Member

    hello @ll,
    im eating 6 meals a day without the postworkout nutrition.
    so i eat every 3 hours one meal (4meals,2shakes)
    7/10/13/16/19/22 o┬┤clock

    im eating about 4300 cal to bulk up and my weight is 80kg
     
  5. Peak_Power

    Peak_Power New Member

    lol choco so that's not you in the pic?
     
  6. Maxgain

    Maxgain New Member

    <div>
    (Aaron_F @ Sep. 25 2005,04:57)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Meal frequency and energy balance.

    Bellisle F, McDevitt R, Prentice AM.

    INSERM U341, Hotel Dieu de Paris, France.

    Several epidemiological studies have observed an inverse relationship between people's habitual frequency of eating and body weight, leading to the suggestion that a 'nibbling' meal pattern may help in the avoidance of obesity. A review of all pertinent studies shows that, although many fail to find any significant relationship, the relationship is consistently inverse in those that do observe a relationship. However, this finding is highly vulnerable to the probable confounding effects of post hoc changes in dietary patterns as a consequence of weight gain and to dietary under-reporting which undoubtedly invalidates some of the studies. We conclude that the epidemiological evidence is at best very weak, and almost certainly represents an artefact. A detailed review of the possible mechanistic explanations for a metabolic advantage of nibbling meal patterns failed to reveal significant benefits in respect of energy expenditure. Although some short-term studies suggest that the thermic effect of feeding is higher when an isoenergetic test load is divided into multiple small meals, other studies refute this, and most are neutral. More importantly, studies using whole-body calorimetry and doubly-labelled water to assess total 24 h energy expenditure find no difference between nibbling and gorging. Finally, with the exception of a single study, there is no evidence that weight loss on hypoenergetic regimens is altered by meal frequency. We conclude that any effects of meal pattern on the regulation of body weight are likely to be mediated through effects on the food intake side of the energy balance equation.</div>
    Thst is for 3 meals a day versus higher frequency macrnutrient typeis then more important. Drop meals to 2 a day and you have a problem
     
  7. Aaron_F

    Aaron_F New Member

    evidence?
     
  8. faz

    faz Active Member

    getting most of your daily food intake in one meal is not really a good idea,simply because of the amount you have to eat.
    but having six or eight meals a day is not any better than one two or three either..even though everybody seems to be jumping on the 6 meals a day bandwaggon no evidence to prove 6 is better than 3

    but there is evidence to prove there is no difference between nibbling and gorging..its what you eat over 24hrs that counts.


    Effect of the pattern of food intake on human energy metabolism.

    Verboeket-van de Venne WP, Westerterp KR, Kester AD.

    Department of Human Biology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

    The pattern of food intake can affect the regulation of body weight and lipogenesis. We studied the effect of meal frequency on human energy expenditure (EE) and its components. During 1 week ten male adults (age 25-61 years, body mass index 20.7-30.4 kg/m2) were fed to energy balance at two meals/d (gorging pattern) and during another week at seven meals/d (nibbling pattern). For the first 6 d of each week the food was provided at home, followed by a 36 h stay in a respiration chamber. O2 consumption and CO2 production (and hence EE) were calculated over 24 h. EE in free-living conditions was measured over the 2 weeks with doubly-labelled water (average daily metabolic rate, ADMR). The three major components of ADMR are basal metabolic rate (BMR), diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and EE for physical activity (ACT). There was no significant effect of meal frequency on 24 h EE or ADMR. Furthermore, BMR and ACT did not differ between the two patterns. DIT was significantly elevated in the gorging pattern, but this effect was neutralized by correction for the relevant time interval. With the method used for determination of DIT no significant effect of meal frequency on the contribution of DIT to ADMR could be demonstrated.


    And another:

    Br J Nutr. 1997 Apr;77 Suppl 1:S57-70. Links
    Meal frequency and energy balance.

    * Bellisle F,
    * McDevitt R,
    * Prentice AM.

    INSERM U341, Hotel Dieu de Paris, France.

    Several epidemiological studies have observed an inverse relationship between people's habitual frequency of eating and body weight, leading to the suggestion that a 'nibbling' meal pattern may help in the avoidance of obesity. A review of all pertinent studies shows that, although many fail to find any significant relationship, the relationship is consistently inverse in those that do observe a relationship. However, this finding is highly vulnerable to the probable confounding effects of post hoc changes in dietary patterns as a consequence of weight gain and to dietary under-reporting which undoubtedly invalidates some of the studies. We conclude that the epidemiological evidence is at best very weak, and almost certainly represents an artefact. A detailed review of the possible mechanistic explanations for a metabolic advantage of nibbling meal patterns failed to reveal significant benefits in respect of energy expenditure. Although some short-term studies suggest that the thermic effect of feeding is higher when an isoenergetic test load is divided into multiple small meals, other studies refute this, and most are neutral. More importantly, studies using whole-body calorimetry and doubly-labelled water to assess total 24 h energy expenditure find no difference between nibbling and gorging. Finally, with the exception of a single study, there is no evidence that weight loss on hypoenergetic regimens is altered by meal frequency. We conclude that any effects of meal pattern on the regulation of body weight are likely to be mediated through effects on the food intake side of the energy balance equation













    Status: online To a group of 8 healthy persons a slightly hypocaloric diet with protein (13% of energy), carbohydrates (46% of energy) and fat (41% of energy) was given as one meal or as five meals in a change-over trial. Each person was 2 weeks on each regimen. Under the conditions of slight undernutrition and neutral temperature the balances of nitrogen, carbon and energy were assessed in 7-day collection periods, and according to 48-hour measurements of gaseous exchange (carbon-nitrogen balance method) by the procedures of indirect calorimetry. Changes of body weight were statistically not significant. At isocaloric supply of metabolizable energy with exactly the same foods in different meal frequencies no differences were found in the retention of carbon and energy. Urinary nitrogen excretion was slightly greater with a single daily meal, indicating influences on protein metabolism. The protein-derived energy was compensated by a decrease in the fat oxidation. The heat production calculated by indirect calorimetry was not significantly different with either meal frequency. Water, sodium and potassium balances were not different. The plasma concentrations of cholesterol and uric acid were not influenced by meal frequency, glucose and triglycerides showed typical behaviour depending on the time interval to the last meal. The results demonstrate that the meal frequency did not influence the energy balance.


    Meal frequency influences circulating hormone levels but not lipogenesis rates in humans.

    Jones PJ, Namchuk GL, Pederson RA.

    Division of Human Nutrition, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

    To determine whether human lipogenesis is influenced by the frequency of meal consumption, 12 subjects were divided into two groups and fed isocaloric nutritionally adequate liquid diets over 3 days, either as three larger diurnal (n = 6) or as six small, evenly spaced (n = 6) meals per day. On day 2 (08:00 h) of each diet period, 0.7 g deuterium (D) oxide/kg body water was administered and blood was collected every 4 hours over 48 hours for measurement of plasma insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) levels. At each time point, the incorporation of D into plasma triglyceride fatty acid (TG-FA) was also determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry after TG-FA extraction and combustion/reduction. Insulin and GIP levels were elevated over daytime periods in subjects fed three versus six meals per day. Contribution of de novo synthesis to total TG-FA production was not significantly different for days 2 and 3 in subjects consuming three (6.56% +/- 1.32% and 6.64% +/- 2.08%, respectively) and six (7.67% +/- 2.29% and 7.88% +/- 1.46%, respectively) meals per day. Net TG-FA synthesis rates over days 2 and 3 were 1.47 +/- 0.33 and 1.55 +/- 0.53 g/d, respectively, for subjects fed three meals per day, and 1.64 +/- 0.47 and 1.69 +/- 0.30 g/d for subjects fed six meals per day. These findings suggest that consuming fewer but larger daily meals is not accompanied by increases in TG-FA synthesis, despite the observation of hormonal peaks.
     
  9. scientific muscle

    scientific muscle New Member

    Thanks, Faz! Excellent info. [​IMG]
     

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