A diet please?

Discussion in 'Diet & Nutrition' started by Matt Daniels, Oct 20, 2006.

  1. dkm1987

    dkm1987 New Member

    <div>
    (etothepii @ Oct. 30 2006,19:43)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">People who support the six meal a day, or whatever philosophy have, I think, a valid argument against these studies. The studies measure weight change (not measured in fat gain/loss vs. muscle gain/loss) over a short period of time, with no exercise.

    The people who eat this way do it in order to maximixe muscle fat ratios in conjunction with exercise over extended periods -- entire bulking or cutting cycles. Frankly, these studies aren't valid under these scenarios. They may still be 100% correct. That's not what I'm arguing. But I do question their validity to body builders especially.</div>
    Well actually NO, what they espouse, continually I might add, is that meal frequency affects BMR or somehow increases DIT which would add to increases in TEE. This is not the case, this argument has been debated about a bizillion times here before and each time it ends up the same. Now throw in the energy expense of exercise and you have a whole another argument, which still does not validate the need for increased meal frequency, it validates the need to exercise?
     
  2. <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Well actually NO, what they espouse, continually I might add, is that meal frequency affects BMR or somehow increases DIT which would add to increases in TEE. This is not the case, this argument has been debated about a bizillion times here before and each time it ends up the same. Now throw in the energy expense of exercise and you have a whole another argument, which still does not validate the need for increased meal frequency, it validates the need to exercise?</div>

    I must be reading from some one else's playbook than.

    BTW, I'm familiar with BMR, but don't know what DIT and TEE refer too.


    About eating/exercising... after a bout of exercise, do you believe the body uses the nutrients of a 300 calorie jelly donut in the same way it would 300 calories of chicken and whole wheat bread, for example?
     
  3. javacody

    javacody New Member

    I'm new here, but I wanted to throw in my 2 cents on the more smaller meals thing. I'm a classic endomorph who would eat 3 times per day. I also fell into a pattern of stress eating after work (you know, eating instead of punching the jackass in the cube next to yours? [​IMG]). I'd come home and consume more calories in supper than I would eating the entire rest of the day. I'd go to bed uncomfortably full. Believe me, if you want to get really fat really fast, do this.

    Over the past week, I've been eating 6 - 7 smaller meals and stop eating 3 or so hours before bedtime. My appetite at night used to be unstoppable. My brain would be on vacation and I would be an eating machine. Not so anymore with the 6 to 7 small meals. I've also become increasingly sensitive to carbs. The smaller meals seem to really help out with this. I used to almost pass out after dinner, now I eat a small meal and enjoy time with my family.

    For a normal, healthy individual, three big meals per day would probably be ok, as long as they are healthy, whole foods NOT high in trans fats and high fructose corn syrup and/or sugar. I'm just arguing that for an overweight endomorph, six small meals works better from my limited experience. How many average americans seem to be overweight endomorphs? [​IMG]
     
  4. dkm1987

    dkm1987 New Member

    <div>
    (javacody @ Nov. 04 2006,09:11)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">I'm new here, but I wanted to throw in my 2 cents on the more smaller meals thing. I'm a classic endomorph who would eat 3 times per day. I also fell into a pattern of stress eating after work (you know, eating instead of punching the jackass in the cube next to yours?  [​IMG]). I'd come home and consume more calories in supper than I would eating the entire rest of the day. I'd go to bed uncomfortably full. Believe me, if you want to get really fat really fast, do this.

    Over the past week, I've been eating 6 - 7 smaller meals and stop eating 3 or so hours before bedtime. My appetite at night used to be unstoppable. My brain would be on vacation and I would be an eating machine. Not so anymore with the 6 to 7 small meals. I've also become increasingly sensitive to carbs. The smaller meals seem to really help out with this. I used to almost pass out after dinner, now I eat a small meal and enjoy time with my family.

    For a normal, healthy individual, three big meals per day would probably be ok, as long as they are healthy, whole foods NOT high in trans fats and high fructose corn syrup and/or sugar. I'm just arguing that for an overweight endomorph, six small meals works better from my limited experience. How many average americans seem to be overweight endomorphs?  [​IMG]</div>
    Which is what has been said time and time again on this forum, yes, increased meal frequency may help with satiety, but from an energy standpoint if they are equal is not going to matter much overall.

    As far as your eating habits, Been there done that and I have the certificate to prove it but again it wasn't the feeding pattern it was the over eating that is the root cause. So whether you are overeating with 6X day or if overeating 3X day, it makes no difference you are still in a caloric surplus state and gonna get fat.
     
  5. dkm1987

    dkm1987 New Member

    <div>
    (etothepii @ Oct. 31 2006,10:55)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE"> <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Well actually NO, what they espouse, continually I might add, is that meal frequency affects BMR or somehow increases DIT which would add to increases in TEE. This is not the case, this argument has been debated about a bizillion times here before and each time it ends up the same. Now throw in the energy expense of exercise and you have a whole another argument, which still does not validate the need for increased meal frequency, it validates the need to exercise?</div>

    I must be reading from some one else's playbook than.

    BTW, I'm familiar with BMR, but don't know what DIT and TEE refer too.


    About eating/exercising... after a bout of exercise, do you believe the body uses the nutrients of a 300 calorie jelly donut in the same way it would 300 calories of chicken and whole wheat bread, for example?</div>
    DIT=Dietary Induced Thermogenesis
    TEE=Total Energy Expenditure

    I'm not talking about nutrients I'm talking about energy.
     
  6. Fausto

    Fausto HST Expert

    Way to go bulldog, awsome stuff those spreadsheets. [​IMG]
     

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