Grip test

Discussion in 'Strength-Specific Training (SST)' started by Lol, Feb 15, 2007.

  1. Lol

    Lol Super Moderator Staff Member

    I would be reluctant to shake hands with Steve when he's in a good mood, especially if he had a wicked glint in his eye! [​IMG]
     
  2. quadancer

    quadancer New Member

    He told me he saves that for lawyers and his In-laws. [​IMG]


    Hey, I was just jokin' about the negatives, but if you can do them, why not?
     
  3. stevejones

    stevejones Member

    Yeah, but you guys gotta understand that I've been training the grip specifically for 15 min. three days a week and sometimes on saturday also for a little over 2 yrs. without ever missing a grip workout.  You can really progress a long way in that time as long as you don't get lazy.  When I started I couldn't even close a little HG #2 for one rep (which is about the equivalent of a COC # 1.5)  Yeah, there's nothing as enjoyable as squeezing a disliked inlaw's knuckles together, lol...nah, I don't do that crap....grip training is just for fun...and messy ! (chaulk everywhere)
     
  4. Lol

    Lol Super Moderator Staff Member

    Well Steve, I'm going to take it seriously too. I already feel that closing the No2 is not far off. I don't know why but I just find it really good therapy. I'm going to be doing my grip training on my non-workout days (along with some calf work) as I get a bit restless sitting in front of a computer all day and enjoy having something other than cardio to do.

    Quad: negs are a recommended part of grip training with COC grippers as is the application of a 5x5 type program to a grip workout. This is gonna be fun.

    ===================================

    Q: What do you call 500 lawyers at the bottom of the sea?

    A: A pretty good start! [​IMG]
     
  5. scientific muscle

    scientific muscle New Member

    I probably won't be using grippers, but I started doing these:
    Cable rollers with a 25 lb. plate. My forearms were about to explode with the pump after these!!! Killer! [​IMG]
     
  6. quadancer

    quadancer New Member

    25!!! I thought most guys used a dime! Ya beast !
     
  7. scientific muscle

    scientific muscle New Member

    My buddy was doing a dime, I laughed at him and did it with the 25. It was harder than I thought...working my way up to a 45!
     
  8. bluejacket

    bluejacket New Member

    <div>
    (scientific muscle @ Mar. 12 2007,19:33)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">I probably won't be using grippers, but I started doing these:
    Cable rollers with a 25 lb. plate.  My forearms were about to explode with the pump after these!!! Killer! [​IMG]</div>
    ill throw out a little info ive learned from doing those.

    i prefer to do cable roller while standing on chairs (1-2 feet apart) with my arms hanging straight down. this allows for way more distance travel with the wgt as well as safer travel (nothing for the wgt to bang into). it also takes the arms and shoulders out of the equation. as you can even see in the link it gets pretty easy to involve those areas, especially when fatigue sets in.

    since raising the wgt is harder then lowering the wgt i make sure i use equal amount of reps (up and down) with each of the 2 roll grips.

    hope thats of some help, good luck
     
  9. Lol

    Lol Super Moderator Staff Member

    <div>
    (Lol @ Mar. 05 2007,15:38)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Update on the COC grippers:

    I took delivery of my order from IronMind today - only three days from ordering! Brilliant!

    Managed to close the No.1 gripper right off the bat with my right hand but not quite with my left. Managed 10 good reps with the Trainer (100lb) gripper. So, it looks like I'm going to have to order the No.2 already and start working towards closing that. I now have to try to get 10 reps with the No.1.

    My goal has now changed to closing the No 2 by the end of the year.</div>
    Just a further update on my progress with the CoC grippers and general overall grip strength:

    I can now close the No.2 gripper with my right hand and almost with my left. I can get 10 reps with the No.1 with my right hand and around 7 with my left.

    So, in a month and one week I have gone from 1 (and then only just) to 10 good reps with the No.1. A lot of my reps have been done Max Stim style and for sets of 5.

    As I have been cutting my guess is that most of my strength gains are neural in nature. I expect progress will slow somewhat now but closing the No.2 sooner than expected is a big boost. Can't wait until I start eating more again.

    These CoC grippers have really helped my deadlifts. I now feel that my grip is no longer the weak link. Even after 10 reps with 315 I can hold the bar with confidence.

    I now have the CoC No.3 to start on. I can't believe that the No.2 felt like this only a month or so ago!
     
  10. Bulldog

    Bulldog Active Member

    Great progress Lol!
     
  11. Rain

    Rain New Member

    I know this is in the strength section, but I was wondering...how does all this grip training affect forearm size? Have you noticed any difference there, compared to before starting to work the grip specifically?

    Regards,
    /R
     
  12. stevejones

    stevejones Member

    <div>
    (Rain @ Apr. 19 2007,17:19)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">I know this is in the strength section, but I was wondering...how does all this grip training affect forearm size? Have you noticed any difference there, compared to before starting to work the grip specifically?

    Regards,
    /R</div>
    Grip training has had very little effect on the size of my forearms.
     
  13. bluejacket

    bluejacket New Member

    <div>
    (stevejones @ Apr. 20 2007,12:02)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE"><div>
    (Rain @ Apr. 19 2007,17:19)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">I know this is in the strength section, but I was wondering...how does all this grip training affect forearm size? Have you noticed any difference there, compared to before starting to work the grip specifically?

    Regards,
    /R</div>
    Grip training has had very little effect on the size of my forearms.</div>
    this has been my experience as well. im sure i havent done grip training for as long or as intense as s. jones but the size i hoped would be a side benefit from grip training has been largely unrealized. i did gain some added size (over just normal lifting) but certainly nothing that would justify the effort i put into my grip training.
     
  14. quadancer

    quadancer New Member

    I was really wondering that myself. You've seen those circular racks with springs and finger loops that you squeeze? I'd wonder if using that thing would be different in any way?
    Forearms it would appear, have to be exersized by contraction rather than isometrically for hypertrophy. Glad I'm a carpenter half the time.
     
  15. bluejacket

    bluejacket New Member

    i think genetics play signif. role in forearm size, similar to calves for many people. i used to work with chainsaws a lot (serious forearm work for hrs on end). some developed huge grip strength as well as size and others (myself) developed huge grip strength but very little added size. we were all doing the same amount of work for the same amount of time so.........genetic diff. is the only conclusion i can draw.
     
  16. colby2152

    colby2152 New Member

    Deadlifts = big forearms
     
  17. Lol

    Lol Super Moderator Staff Member

    Most of the muscles of the forearm involved in grip strength are not large and so even if they grow quite a bit, the size of your forearm isn't going to be makedly different.

    Larger muscles of the forearm are involved in wrist and elbow flexion and wrist extension. Grip strength plays its part because it helps with exercises like deadlifts which in turn work the larger muscles of the forearms. So, if you want big powerful forearms you need to do heavy deadlifts, chins, pull-ups and rows. Heavy curls will also give your wrist flexors a good blast.

    Another great way to blast your forearms is to do heavy wrist roller work for both extensors and flexors. I am adding this to my grip strength work on days away from the gym.
     
  18. stevejones

    stevejones Member

    One thing I have noticed recently about my grip is that 'hex dumbbell pinching' (not sure what you call it) seems to help me hold onto a barbell more than any other exercise (even static holds with a barbell).  What I refer to as &quot;hex dumbbell pinching&quot; is just standing a hex dumbbell upright, and picking it up with one hand, then holding onto it for 30 seconds (or as long as possible).  

    I get pretty bored doing the same grip exercises all the time, so have varied my exercises alot.  I'll drop a couple of exercises and pick up some new ones, etc. etc.  My grip has always progressed slightly no matter how much I vary the exercises, except when I drop the hex dumbbell stuff.  When I drop that exercise my ability to hold onto the bar during deadlifts weakens slightly (for instance, I'll feel the bar start slipping out of my hands while on the 5th rep of my heaviest sets).  

    I don't why this exercise makes my grip stronger than the other exercises.  Perhaps it's because your ability to hold onto a bar is greatly dependent on the strength of your fingers and hands, not just the forearm.  Dumbbell pinching vastly improves the strength of your fingers.  Plate pinching, ball squeezing, gripper work, etc. etc.  don't seem to work my fingers as much as dumbbell work does.  If anyone in this thread has trouble holding onto the bar, might want to give the dumbbells a shot.
     
  19. Lol

    Lol Super Moderator Staff Member

    Very interesting Steve. I'm not familiar with the size of the hex dbs you are referring to. What do you reckon the approx diameter of the db is and also what size hand do you have? I guess matching the width of the thing you are gripping to your hand size is part of the reason why this can work so well. Perhaps forcing the thumb to play a key roll in gripping is the key here? Grippers tend not to demand that much from the thumbs.

    As an aside: although not strength related, my grandfather, on my father's side, was tall and had a massive hand span. He could pick up three crown-green bowls (not 10-pin bowling balls but still pretty big) in each hand along with jacks and hold them out in front of him! My father has a photo which I must get scanned as it's amazing to see. It was his little party trick. Sadly, I inherited my mother's small hands so I have a relatively small span and can't get anywhere near to performing that feat. [​IMG]
     
  20. stevejones

    stevejones Member

    My hands are large, but not huge. Certainly not big enough to do any of that stuff your grandfather did. A hex dumbbell is a dumbbell that has a hexagon on each side of it. I've never seen one over 100lbs, because once you get up to that weight they are enormous and impractical to use. They are very common in the States, and are usually the cheapest dumbbells you can buy (cheap in both quality and price). You might not have them in Europe, because I've never seen a pair measured in kilos.

    To hold onto these dumbbells you have to spread your fingers out as far as they can go (kind of like palming a basketball). An incredible amount of tension is put on each finger. When you pinch plates or use grippers you don't have as much stress put on each finger because they are all mashed together so the strongest fingers take up some of the slack for the smaller fingers. When you hold hex dumbbells, your fingers are all spread out, so when your weakest finger fails, the whole hand will fail. During very heavy deadlifts, your fingers are all together, but as you lift the weight of the bar, your fingers begin to slip away from each other slightly. When this happens, the weaker fingers will start to slip off the bar (especially the pinky). So, the stronger your fingers the better your grip. That's been my experience with deadlifting anyway. If you have strong fingers but weak forearms then this exercise might not help you at all. I guess the fingers are my weakest link in the deadlift.

    My hands are large enough to hold the 60s, but any hex past that weight is too big for me to hold, so I compensate by putting rope through plates and tying it to the dumbbell.
     

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