Matt Lauer can suck it!

Discussion in 'Hypertrophy Research' started by Bryan Haycock, Sep 14, 2009.

  1. Bryan Haycock

    Bryan Haycock Administrator Staff Member

    West DW, Kujbida GW, Moore D, Atherton PJ, Burd NA, Padzik JP, Delisio M, Tang
    JE, Parise G, Rennie MJ, Baker SK, Phillips SM. Resistance exercise-induced
    increases in putative anabolic hormones do not enhance muscle protein synthesis
    or intracellular signalling in young men. J Physiol. 2009 Sep 7.

    We aimed to determine whether exercise-induced elevations in systemic concentration of testosterone, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) enhanced post-exercise myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and phosphorylation of signalling proteins important in regulating mRNA translation. Eight young men (20+/-1.1 y, BMI = 26+/-3.5 kg.m-2) completed two exercise protocols designed to maintain basal hormone concentrations (LH = low hormone) or elicit increases in endogenous hormones (HH = high hormone). In the LH protocol, participants performed a bout of unilateral resistance exercise with the elbow flexors. The HH protocol consisted of the same elbow flexor exercise with the contra-lateral arm followed immediately by high-volume leg resistance exercise. Participants consumed 25 g of protein after arm exercise to maximize MPS. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken as appropriate. There were no changes in serum testosterone, GH or IGF-1 after the LH protocol, whereas there were marked elevations after HH (testosterone, P < 0.001; GH, P < 0.001; IGF-1, P < 0.05). Exercise stimulated a rise MPS in the biceps brachii (rest = 0.040+/-0.007, LH = 0.071+/-0.008, HH = 0.064+/-0.014 %.h-1; P < 0.05) with no effect of elevated hormones (P = 0.72). Phosphorylation of the 70-kDa S6 protein kinase (p70S6K) also increased post-exercise (P < 0.05) with no differences between conditions. We conclude that the transient increases in endogenous purportedly anabolic hormones do not enhance fed-state anabolic signalling or MPS following resistance exercise. Local mechanisms are likely to be of predominant importance for the post-exercise increase in MPS.
     
  2. quadancer

    quadancer New Member

    Not the first I've heard of this, but what gets me in their testing is this " unilateral resistance exercise with the elbow flexors"...what, are they afraid of barbells?
    Then followed by high volume legwork?
    Please.
     
  3. QuantumPositron

    QuantumPositron New Member

    Lol. Another myth annihilated by the mighty Bryan Haycock.
     
  4. dkm1987

    dkm1987 New Member

    <div>
    (quadancer @ Sep. 14 2009,7:57)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">&quot; unilateral resistance exercise with the elbow flexors&quot;...what, are they afraid of barbells?
    Then followed by high volume legwork?
    Please.</div>
    Actually it is one of the better ways to try and isolate what is occuring systemically versus what is occurring locally. If they had used bilateral exercise then they would not have been able to identify which arm showed changes due to mechanical stimulation versus systemic hormone increases.

    As far as the high leg volume again this is a common method used to induce a metabolic strain and hence increases hormonal activity.

    I've always thought this ridiculous and I'm glad it's being put to rest.
     
  5. omega99

    omega99 Member

    This just occurred to me...shouldn't we consider net protein retention as opposed soley to MPS? Any possibility increases in GH and testosterone could have an inhibitory effect on protein degradation?
     
  6. dkm1987

    dkm1987 New Member

    <div>
    (omega99 @ Dec. 15 2009,9:19)</div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">This just occurred to me...shouldn't we consider net protein retention as opposed soley to MPS? Any possibility increases in GH and testosterone could have an inhibitory effect on protein degradation?</div>
    And of course that is a possibility. There is a recent paper that actually shows that GH increases can induce changes in PS but it appears to impact collagen synthesis more so than fibril PS. So if PS is elevated and breakdown is held constant then of course net balance will rise, be it in fibril, sarcoplasmic or collagen. Looking at the old papers that looked at whole muscle PS vs PB it's pretty apparent that breakdown can be swayed to the left by training and nutrition and I would bet hormones as well.
     
  7. coach hale

    coach hale New Member

    Thanks for posting

    coach hale
     

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