Repeated Bout Effect

Discussion in 'Hypertrophy Research' started by Bryan Haycock, Jun 16, 2008.

  1. Bryan Haycock

    Bryan Haycock Administrator Staff Member

    J Strength Cond Res. 2008 Mar;22(2):597-607.

    Comparison of responses to strenuous eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors between resistance-trained and untrained men.

    Newton MJ, Morgan GT, Sacco P, Chapman DW, Nosaka K.

    This study compared resistance-trained and untrained men for changes in commonly used indirect markers of muscle damage after maximal voluntary eccentric exercise
    of the elbow flexors. Fifteen trained men (28.2 +/- 1.9 years, 175.0 +/- 1.6 cm, and 77.6 +/- 1.9 kg) who had resistance trained for at least 3 sessions per week
    incorporating exercises involving the elbow flexor musculature for an average of 7.7 +/- 1.4 years, and 15 untrained men (30.0 +/- 1.5 years, 169.8 +/- 7.4 cm,
    and 79.9 +/- 4.4 kg) who had not performed any resistance training for at least 1 year, were recruited for this study. All subjects performed 10 sets of 6 maximal
    voluntary eccentric actions of the elbow flexors of one arm against the lever arm of an isokinetic dynamometer moving at a constant velocity of 90 degrees .s.
    Changes in maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic torque, range of motion, upper arm circumference, plasma creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness
    before, immediately after, and for 5 days after exercise were compared between groups. The trained group showed significantly (P < 0.05) smaller changes in all
    of the measures except for muscle soreness and faster recovery of muscle function compared with the untrained group. For example, muscle strength of the trained
    group recovered to the baseline by 3 days after exercise, where the untrained group showed approximately 40% lower strength than baseline. These results
    suggest that resistance-trained men are less susceptible to muscle damage induced by maximal eccentric exercise than untrained subjects.
     
  2. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Active Member

    hmmm interesting...

    but is it fair to say that muscle damage and muscle function are interrelated? as in, because the untrained group didn't have strength return to baseline as fast, does that mean that they had more muscle damage (as in microtrauma)? i'm not sure how that follows... (CNS recovery?)

    just some curiosities [​IMG]
     
  3. dkm1987

    dkm1987 New Member

    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">All subjects performed 10 sets of 6 maximal voluntary eccentric actions of the elbow flexors of one arm against the lever arm of an isokinetic dynamometer moving at a constant velocity of 90 degrees .s.</div>Ouch

    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">These results suggest that resistance-trained men are less susceptible to muscle damage induced by maximal eccentric exercise than untrained subjects</div>

    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">The trained group showed significantly (P &lt; 0.05) smaller changes in all
    of the measures except for muscle soreness </div>Again DOMS does not equal damage
     
  4. colby2152

    colby2152 New Member

    <div></div><div id="QUOTEHEAD">QUOTE</div><div id="QUOTE">Again DOMS does not equal damage </div>

    i.e. DOMS [​IMG] Growth
     
  5. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Active Member

    hmm i should've said i don't believe that strength returning to baseline faster equals better growth, i think my sentence was mixed... lol [​IMG]
     

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