Understanding Carbs/Fats/Protein Balance

Discussion in 'Diet & Nutrition' started by TheSeeker07, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. TheSeeker07

    TheSeeker07 New Member

    If anybody here can help show me the proper balance for these and why it is balanced that way it would help!

    I would also like to understand how much protein I should be intaking per day...
     
  2. Champalex

    Champalex New Member

    the calorie ratio (carb/protein/fat) I use is 50/35/15

    I eat between 600-900 cals above maintenance and get around 180 grams of protein on workout days and 150-160 on non workout days (I weigh about 148 lbs)


    at least 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight will do
     
  3. TheSeeker07

    TheSeeker07 New Member

    I know I eat enough calories, I'm just trying to figure out for protein. Thanks for the help!
     
  4. CDB

    CDB New Member

    There is no magic ratio, it depends on biological and practical issues. Just make sure you're getting about a gram of protein per pound of body weight and you're likely taking enough protein in. Muddle with the carbs and fats and see what makes you feel best and what makes it easiest to hit your calorie goals. Best way to do this is to start tracking what you're eating now for a while, decide what changes you want to make and then look for the most practical way to implement those changes. For me, right now I'm at about a 1/3 of my calories coming from each.
     
  5. Bryan Haycock

    Bryan Haycock Administrator Staff Member

    Keep in mind that the body will adapt to different ratios. So, if you eat mroe carbs, your body will burn more carbs, if you eat less, it will burn less. As others have mentioned, start with total calories, then see how many calories your protein provides, then add about an equal about of carbs, and the rest comes form fat. Some people do better with more carbs/less fat, others - like myself - seem to do better on less carbs.
     
  6. TheSeeker07

    TheSeeker07 New Member

    I've been trying to eat at least 1k above my natural calorie count which is 3k, it's not easy at all. I just want to make sure I have enough protein to build the muscles.
     
  7. CDB

    CDB New Member

    Well, if you are getting enough then the key is be in a calorie surplus. And remember, people are horrible at estimating calorie intake, so don't estimate. Track it like a hawk and to the best of your abilities. Because, invariably, if you're winging it and trying to diet down, you're eating more than you think, and if you're trying to bulk you're not eating as much as you think. That's one of the reasons the old Gallon of Milk a Day diet worked so well for bulking. It's kind of hard to avoid a surplus with 2300 extra calories.
     
  8. TheSeeker07

    TheSeeker07 New Member

    I use fitday.com, and just eat, eat, eat...I also drink milk like a champ.
     
  9. a.s.arghmatey

    a.s.arghmatey Member

    According to the HST ebook, a 100 kg lifter should consume 880 calories from protein, 724 from fat, and 2016 from carbs.

    This implies that the suggested ratio would be 25%, 20%, 55%.

    Did I interpret that correctly?
     
  10. mickc1965

    mickc1965 Well-Known Member

    Correct, that example is for someone who is bulking
     
  11. Totentanz

    Totentanz Super Moderator Staff Member

    Don't get too hung up on the percentages. Remember, the guideline is ~1 gram of protein per lb, that isn't going to be the same percentage for different size lifters. Then roughly ~25% of your calories from fat, and the rest from carbs. The percentages are going to vary. Also keep in mind that some people don't do as well with such high a carb intake, so you will have to do some tweaking based on your own body. Also, that much protein isn't necessarily required for optimal growth.
     
  12. Jester

    Jester Well-Known Member

    I would argue roughly 1.5gms per kg, necessary fats, and then carb away.

    However, for someone like me, I will go appetite crazy on that.

    Currently (cutting) I'm on roughly 300gms of protein, low carbs and the rest from fats. If I were to drop-back to say 150, and make it up in carbs, I'd go crazy with appetite. That's just me.

    The satiety factor is a massive component for successful (literal) recomposition of your body type (whether bulking or cutting).

    I also gain much better on high protein.
     
  13. wungun

    wungun Member

    I agree, 1 to 1.5g protein per 1lbs body weight...
    But I no long subscribe to the "eat surplus calories or you won't build muscle" technique.
    I'm at 160lbs, I eat 150 to 160g of daily protein, and as much carbs as I can down before I hit my calorie limit... Which, I'll tell you right now, is only 2000kcal.
    Of course, you will consume fat indirectly, so after my protein requirements are met, I cram down the carbs until I hit my calories (aiming for as little fat as possible) . Whatever fat I do eat, I try to keep it low and healthy (fish oil, coconut oil/milk...)
    I also train fasted, and time my carbs/majority of protein post workout (workouts are at 4pm for me)
     
  14. Totentanz

    Totentanz Super Moderator Staff Member

    Dietary fat does not build body fat.
     
  15. wungun

    wungun Member

    No, but consuming calories from dietary fat takes away calories that would be much better off used on protein and carbs... And at 9kcal per gram, it starts adding up fast. And if you're daily caloric intake is as low as mine, you don't want to be waiting calories on fat.
    :)
     
  16. Totentanz

    Totentanz Super Moderator Staff Member

    Yeah except cut the fat too low and you mess up your hormonal balance which will compromise fat loss.
     
  17. wungun

    wungun Member

    That's why I don't eat anything but fat and protein (and fibre) before 4pm...
    Healthy fats... Fish oil, coconut oil, olive oil...
    But delve too much into bacon, cheese, pork, sausages when it comes to my "back loading", and it's easy to over do it with the calories...and not so healthy fats.
    Steak, fish, chicken, beans, almost all have enough fat and omega's for good hormone regulation.
     

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