Have You Found Answers To All Your Questions?

Discussion in 'Hypertrophy-Specific Training (HST)' started by Bryan Haycock, Jan 22, 2018.

  1. Old and Grey

    Old and Grey Super Moderator Staff Member

    After you have built a solid base of strength using high weight and low reps, which takes years, I have found that I now get the most mass gains by doing 20, 15, and 10 reps. It also is helpful in avoiding injury and keeping joints healthy. Age is undoubtedly a factor in there somewhere.
     
  2. mickc1965

    mickc1965 Well-Known Member

    I am finding that as well even though only in my fifties, finding Bench a problem even at 10 reps.
     
  3. adpowah

    adpowah Active Member

    One question I have is if you are doing the typical 15s -> 10s -> 5s are you doing the same number of sets for each rep scheme (eg 2x15, 2x10, 2x5)?
     
  4. Old and Grey

    Old and Grey Super Moderator Staff Member

    Ad, I go pretty close to max effort on the first set, which may go up or even down on any given day but will be close to the target, followed by two quick sets of myo reps which will be less than the target but using the same weight. How many reps less will depend on the rest period between sets. I try and stay within 20 seconds. So it totals 3 sets of one exercise for each workout for each bodypart split into 6 bodyparts or 18 sets in total...6 actual and 12 myo. I vary exercises between workouts but they remain multi joint core excercises for the most part. This is pretty grueling so I only workout 3 times per week although I may split it up between AM/PM or even over two days in which case I workout 6 days per week but with half the daily work. This hold true for the 20's, 15's and 10's. I hope I didn't confuse you but it is difficult to explain in a few words. It stays true to the fundamentals of HST with some tweaking from the original templates originally shown which should still be used by beginners and intermediates. My opinion only.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2018
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  5. adpowah

    adpowah Active Member

    @Old and Grey I think it makes sense, basically you would do a lift [email protected], rest 20 seconds myo reps @8-9RPE, rest 20 seconds myo reps @8-9rpe, then you're done with that lift. Is that correct?
     
  6. Old and Grey

    Old and Grey Super Moderator Staff Member

    What do you mean by RPE?
     
  7. mickc1965

    mickc1965 Well-Known Member

    I assume it's the 'rate of received exertion' with 10 being a max all out set with no more reps possible.
     
  8. Old and Grey

    Old and Grey Super Moderator Staff Member

    Ad, I guess I must have fallen asleep that day in school. What does [email protected] 8-9 RPE mean? Please give an example.

    In my routine, I use a weight that I can do, for example, 20 continuous reps for the first set but barely making the 20th rep but still maintaining good form. If I conquer that, the next workout I usually add another rep as oppossed to adding weight. I also do not do 2 weeks of each rep range but do, for example, 20's on Monday, 15's on Wednesday and 10's on Friday.
     
  9. adpowah

    adpowah Active Member

    Sorry @Old and Grey , as @mickc1965 notes RPE means "rated perceived exertion", other people use "reps in reserve" but it is essentially the same measurement. Basically an RPE 10 lift means you literally gave it everything and barely completed it, 9 means you have 1 rep in reserve, something like an 8.5 would be like one full rep and maybe a second in reserve.
     
  10. Old and Grey

    Old and Grey Super Moderator Staff Member

    OK thanks for the clarification. So I would say that the 20th rep, for example, would be about a 9+.
     
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  11. cjasonpa

    cjasonpa New Member

    ok awesome info guys, thanks appreciate it
     
  12. adpowah

    adpowah Active Member

    Anyone else want to comment on the volume they typically program?

    I've hit my two main strength goals 315 bench and 500 deadlift. And while I am overall ok with my development, but I'd like to be bigger before I start working on my next strength goals. Below is my typical full body programming but I am not sure it is hypertrophy focused enough. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

    Normal programming (full body training, not specialized):
    • 15s (high rep): 2 sets each of two lower body lifts (one always being Deadlift or Squat, usually not Squat AND Deadlift unless the intensity is low). 2 sets each for two upper body lifts (bench and something for the back), then I usually do some high rep work for the other stuffs (bicep, triceps, shoulders, etc). 15s kick my butt as far as conditioning (so I probably need more)
    • 10s and 5s (mid reps): I keep the above template but I add a set for 10s (3 in total) from the 15s and then another set for 5s (4 in total). At some point in these two phases, I also drop the "other stuff lifts".
    • 2s or singles: I drop other lifts and the supplementary lifts which means I really only squat/deadlift and bench/back. I may do bench and back on the same day but definitely don't squat and deadlift on the same day. I like this because it gives me a lot of practice with 95% range weights but I imagine it has low to no hypertrophy effects.
    My own criticism (and I welcome others):
    • Not enough sets at the 15s, I think I had been too focused on the concept of getting 30-ish reps per workout for a muscle. I need to increase my conditioning because 15s shouldn't be as hard as they are. Prolly just lift more weights fast?
    • I think instead I need to focus on "hard sets" and keep it in the 3-4 range per muscle. Maybe 3x15, 3x10, 4x5 and then just keep increasing weight with the 5s until I can't do 4 sets. I think I will stop with the doubles until my hypertrophy gets on point.
    • I need to stop dropping the "other stuffs", instead I should probably program them the same as the main lifts. My mid back, arms, shoulders and traps are a bit on the under-developed side.
     
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  13. NWlifter

    NWlifter Active Member

    I just wanna say congrats on the goals, awesome job. 315 bench, that's NICE!!! I'll let the HST experienced and much more successful people on here do the advice part
     
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  14. Renky

    Renky Member

    I have played with longer SD's and think longer can sometimes help
     
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  15. Old and Grey

    Old and Grey Super Moderator Staff Member

    Awesome job. Personly I would switch to 10 - 20 rep sets but a complete change from power focus to hypertrophyprobably would not feel right so perhaps your graduated projction is likely your best route for 6 months o so.
     
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  16. Bryan Haycock

    Bryan Haycock Administrator Staff Member

    Not much to add here, but here goes. If your goal is size before your next strength program, I would spend more time in the higher reps (maybe add another week), and focus on creating hypoxia/ache/burn in muscles you want to grow. I would skip the 2s, and singles and go no lower than 6-8 reps.
     
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  17. adpowah

    adpowah Active Member

    Thanks @Old and Grey and @Bryan Haycock I've been experimenting with some higher rep work, it definitely has a fatigue profile that I am unused to. Nothing super defined just 15+ rep type sets with a goal of like 100 total reps. Definitely anything approaching 20reps really pushes my cardio which is sad, so I'll just keep working at it.
     
  18. NWlifter

    NWlifter Active Member

    Whoa, wait... for size stay above 6-8 reps and more hypoxia? so moving to heavier and heavier would be worse for size, but more time with higher reps and fatigue would be better for size?
     
  19. adpowah

    adpowah Active Member

    I could be wrong and probably shouldn't speak for Bryan but I believe in the context, that I have overly focused on higher intensity low rep work for a long time and that I can (and I am) see a lot of benefit from improving my high rep work. I suppose you could compare it to a an endurance runner that decides to start lifting, they will see a lot of benefit in the lower rep work because their muscles haven't really developed in the size or strength department. I am just kind of the opposite where my endurance and size are on the under-developed side when compared to my strength so I can get a relatively greater benefit from spending more time in the very high to high rep ranges. I don't think it was intended as a blanket statement that high reps = hypertrophy.
     
  20. NWlifter

    NWlifter Active Member

    Oh ok, I was seeing it that more load, more strain, so if used to 5RM might need 3RM, etc. rather than less load would be a bump in stimulation.
     

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